MiFID II: Fixed income research ‘won’t change’ through unbundling

first_imgThe majority of respondents, 83% and 58%, respectively, said they would use fewer research providers once the new rules come into effect, and that spending on FICC research would increase.An overwhelming majority (86%) said a reduction in the number of research providers would not hurt their funds’ performance. This, AMIC said, pointed to a potential oversupply of research.The vast majority of respondents said they expected to be compliant by the 3 January deadline for research cost unbundling, although more than 60% said they were not yet compliant.Increasing in-house FICC research capacity is on the agenda for a third of respondents, while 68% indicated they did not plan to do so.The world according to MiFID II cost unbundlingMore than 60% of asset managers with global activities plan to pay separately for fixed income research, according to the survey. The remainder largely planned to pay for research in non-EU jurisdictions only for EU clients (31%), while 8% said they would segregate their EU and non-EU businesses.Patrick Karlsson, secretary to the ICMA AMIC, said the figures showed MiFID II would have a global effect.EU and US regulators recently said non-EU asset managers could continue to bundle trading costs and research costs as long as the two were distinguishable from each other. The US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) said it would grant this relief for 30 months.Speaking at an ICMA AMIC event yesterday, Ross Barrett, capital markets specialist at the UK’s asset management trade body, the Investment Association, said the SEC’s announcement was very important, but guidance from the European Commission had solved the issue “for the rest of the world”.“And that does matter,” he continued, “because MiFID II is a new bar, it’s a higher bar that doesn’t exist anywhere else in the world.”Asking managers to comply with the rules in other jurisdictions that in many case had rules to the opposite – such as the US – was not acceptable, he said.Chris Devain, chairman of the European Association of Independent Research Providers, said asset owners were key to changing practices in non-MiFID II jurisdictions.Once asset owners both in Europe and the US “get a flavour and taste for some of the reports that will come out of Europe and that increased transparency” they could put more pressure on US firms that deal internationally to comply with MiFID II research unbundling. The majority of investors think the quality of fixed income, currencies and commodities (FICC) research will not change in the wake of MiFID II rules on research cost unbundling, according to a survey carried out by the International Capital Market Association (ICMA).However, roughly under a third (32%) said they believed it would get worse, and 14% that it would improve.The survey was of members of the ICMA Asset Management and Investors’ Council (AMIC) and was carried out last month. It sought to discover firms’ intentions and progress regarding the implementation of MiFID II research unbundling requirements specifically in relation to FICC research.Just under half (46%) of the investors said a significant majority (75% or more) of their existing FICC research providers had not yet approached them about potential pricing arrangements.last_img read more

Experts discuss arguments for and against assisted dying ahead of election referendum

first_img“Prognosis is an estimate. International literature and our own daily experience shows we’re often wrong about prognosis. Donnelly said she was opposing the act as it was written. TVNZ One News 18 September 2020Family First Comment: One is a ‘researcher’. The other is a real doctor – a palliative care specialist with real world experience and dealing daily with the care of actual people.WATCH as she DESTROYS the argument of the pro-euthanasia academic!“We care for people who are facing their death every day. … We live in the real world. When we read this act as it’s written and apply it to the real world, it leaks. It’s not waterproof or safe in any way. There are multiple reasons and multiple risks we’ve identified.” She said it could be difficult to judge whether a person was being coerced into assisted dying because coercion can be subtle.“We care for people who are facing their death every day. … We live in the real world. When we read this act as it’s written and apply it to the real world, it leaks. It’s not waterproof or safe in any way. There are multiple reasons and multiple risks we’ve identified.” She said it could be difficult to judge whether a person was being coerced into assisted dying because coercion can be subtle.Two euthanasia experts spoke to TVNZ1’s Breakfast about their views on assisted dying ahead of the End of Life Choice Act referendum in this year’s election.Care Alliance’s Dr Sinead Donnelly, a palliative care doctor and senior lecturer at the University of Otago, outlined the arguments against the act. Care Alliance is made up of a range of organisations, including providers of end-of-life palliative care in New Zealand. “We’re concerned about the risk and we don’t believe that it’s safe,” she said. “How can you create a safe law when the consequences are the death of a person with such imprecise so-called safeguards?”Donnelly said, in her experience, it was common for people to feel as if they were a burden. This means people may not have a true choice between palliative care and euthanasia, Donnelly said.READ MORE: https://www.tvnz.co.nz/one-news/new-zealand/experts-discuss-arguments-and-against-assisted-dying-ahead-election-referendumKeep up with family issues in NZ. Receive our weekly emails direct to your Inbox. There are also challenges to making a prognosis that someone only has six months left to live, Donnelly said. “When we read this act as it’s written and apply it to the real world, it leaks. It’s not waterproof or safe in any way. There are multiple reasons and multiple risks we’ve identified.” “I feel they’re actually going to feel a greater burden. They now have to choose, ‘Do I ask for this or not?’”She said it was already legal for people to ask for treatment to be stopped.She said the palliative care system is rapidly developing but it is “chronically underfunded” in New Zealand, and there are inequities to accessing quality care. When asked why she believed the act was unsafe, despite the High Court and lawyers saying there were more than 45 safeguards, Donnelly said the Care Alliance was looking at it from a practical view.“We [at Care Alliance] care for people who are facing their death every day. … We live in the real world. She said it could be difficult to judge whether a person was being coerced into assisted dying because coersion can be subtle.last_img read more

Turkey condemns Cairo’s flooding of tunnels along Gaza border

first_imgTurkey shoots down Russian warplane near border Tony Blair in Cairo for talks over Gaza violence Related Egypt’s relations with Turkey have hit a fresh low. In the latest incident, the Turkish government has condemned Cairo’s flooding of tunnels along its border with Gaza.Despite all of Erdogan’s criticism, El Sisi has never mentioned Turkey or responded to his accusations. There aren’t significant economic ties between both countries, so basically there is no incentives to mend these ties at this stage.Egypt has yet to respond but analysts say there’s little prospect of an early reconciliation. CCTV’s Adel El Mahrouky reports. Egypt Destroys 20 Newly Found Tunnels Along Border With Gazalast_img