Esquires Granger Magazine Medium So Compelling We All Should Do More with

first_imgSince the report last week about Esquire’s flashy e-paper October anniversary cover—and our follow-up on the technology behind it—I’ve been hearing/reading a lot of negative opinions about it. One Web site called it obnoxious. Rex Hammock said it was “the worst use of technology by a magazine.” Fast Company, in a blog post, estimated that the manufacturing process increases the issue’s carbon footprint by 16 percent over other typical print publications. But, if you ask Esquire editor-in-chief David Granger, the technology could help revolutionize the way we read magazines, beyond the printed page and online.”When I talk to groups I sometimes speak about the days I had when I’d get the new issue of Esquire and go through it and think to myself, ‘Fuck, it’s still a magazine,’” Granger said in a recent interview with FOLIO:. “What I mean is that the medium is so compelling that I and we should all be able to do more with it. The magazine experience is one of the last remaining opportunities to enter a hermetically-sealed world, an edited experience of our culture created by someone else. And, more importantly, it’s an experience that encourages you to stay in it rather than constantly bounce in and out of it. “We have an amazing medium, print, and if we can enhance the experience of it by putting new technology to use, then all the better,” he said.Bob Sacks, an industry consultant and frequent proponent of technology, says that Esquire’s flashy cover may be a small step overall but offers a glimpse of what’s to come in the next few years.”It’s not a representation of what e-paper was designed for, but doing the cover is the right thing to do,” Sacks says. “It will be a demonstration of what it can be used for. In the near future we all will have flexible e-paper readers in our pocket and will be able to access all the magazine and books you want.”Right now, the technology is expensive and, if you believe Fast Company, not very green. Granger says that, with time, he hopes the technology will become cheaper. Maybe, after some refining, the application will become more realistic and environmentally-friendly, too.last_img read more

BREAKING NEWS Wilmington Fireworks Postponed To Sunday Night Due To Forecast

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Below is an announcement from the Wilmington Fourth of July Committee:Due to the forecasted weather, Saturday evening’s Spectacular Fireworks have been moved to Sunday evening at 9:30pm. The carnival will run from 1-10pm on Sunday. The carnival will be CLOSED on Saturday.UPDATE: The Wilmington Minutemen’s Pancake Breakfast will take place as planned on Saturday, July 6 from 7am to 11am on the Town Common. Tickets cost $5. The Cub Scouts Pack 56’s BBQ Chicken Dinner has been postponed to Sunday, July 7 from 5pm to 7pm on the Town Common. Tickets cost $10.Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… Related5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Saturday, July 6, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”HOT OFF THE PRESS: Read The 2019 Wilmington Fun On The Fourth ScheduleIn “Community”BREAKING: Wilmington Fourth of July Committee’s Carnival Request DENIEDIn “Government”last_img read more

India proposes exempting EVs from registration fees report says

first_img 2020 Kia Telluride review: Kia’s new SUV has big style and bigger value 2020 Hyundai Palisade review: Posh enough to make Genesis jealous Car Culture Electric Cars 4:33 3 Juice up the outdoors with Harley-Davidson’s electric bike concepts More From Roadshow See what your new electric car needs to break it in right 2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything better 7 Photos Now playing: Watch this: Comments Share your voice Tags Indian traffic is legendarily wild, but imagine it without the smog haze or the nasal putt-putt of two-stroke engines and diesels. India’s EV incentive wants to make that happen. Hindustan Times/Getty Images Lots of places around the world are looking for ways to incentivize folks to ditch their internal combustion vehicles and get shiny new(er) electric vehicles instead. America famously has its EV tax credit and all its production number provisos and phased phase-out. China has something similar regarding EV purchase subsidies.India is keeping things a little simpler, according to a report Wednesday by Reuters. Rather than dealing with credits or rebates, India is considering simply not charging EV owners registration fees. It’s brilliant.India’s plan would apply not only to cars but to all kinds of electric vehicles, including motorcycles, scooters and autorickshaws. Frankly, we want to see people driving electrified Hindustan Ambassadors around because that would be great.In any case, this a plan that would, in theory at least, require minimal effort on the part of the government and it could prove to be a boon to pollution-clogged India. It would also help to reduce India’s dependence on foreign oil.last_img read more

Pakistani cricketer Hasan Ali set to marry Indian aeronautical engineer

first_imgHasan Ali.Stu Forster/Getty Images.After Zaheer Abbas, Mohsin Khan and Shoaib Malik, 25-year-old pacer Hasan Ali is set to get married to an Indian woman. Hasan is marrying an Indian aeronautical engineer named Shamia Arzoo in Dubai next month. On July 30, Ali took to Twitter and stated that the news was not yet confirmed.”Just wanna clarify my wedding is not confirmed yet, our families have yet to meet and decide upon it. will make a public announcement very soon in sha allah,” his tweet read.But as reported by The Indian Express, the development has been confirmed by Akbar Ali, Arzoo’s elder brother.”Yes, my sister Shamia will be getting married to Pakistani cricketer Hasan Ali next month in Dubai. We have been based in Faridabad for many years now. Shamia studied at Manav Rachna University in Faridabad and has worked in Jet Airways before working for Emirates Airlines as an aeronautical engineer in Dubai. The two families met in Dubai earlier this year and finalised the wedding,” Akbar told The Indian Express.”We will go to Dubai around August 15-16 where the nikaah will be held the same week and walima will be done later,” he added.Liyaqat Ali, father of Shamia, was in Chandigarh for the wedding preparations. He told the Times of India that it does not matter with whom his daughter is getting married if they are happy with each other. Pakistan’s Hasan Ali.NEZAR BALOUT/AFP/Getty”It doesn’t matter whom is she is marrying – an Indian or Pakistani. She is happy and they both like each other. We as a family just respect their decision,” Ali was quoted by TOI.On the other hand, sources close to the 25-year-old cricketer told The Indian Express that the preparations have already begun at Hasan’s home in Gujranwala, Pakistan.Shamia, 26, works as an aeronautical engineer in Dubai.The pace star was in the ICC Cricket World Cup squad of Pakistan. He did not have a great tournament as he picked up only two wickets at an economy rate of 7.75 from the four matches he played. His last match was against India which the Men in Green lost by 89 runs and Hasan finished giving away 84 runs, picking up a single wicket in nine overs.last_img read more

NSF turns to ancient pottery to improve modern heat resistant ceramics

first_img Explore further (PhysOrg.com) — In order to better understand how ceramics are able to resist heat, the National Science Foundation has awarded grants totaling half a million dollars to three research groups to look into how the ancient Greeks made their pottery, a process which allowed for as many as 100,000 vases to survive from ancient antiquity to now – a period of some twenty five hundred years. The hope is that such research will reveal more about the nature of iron-spinel chemistry, which is what gives ceramics an ability to withstand heat while remaining chemically stable. Getting a better grip on how ceramics work is critical to future space flight technological efforts, as ceramics are used to help space vehicles withstand both extreme hot and cold temperatures. © 2011 PhysOrg.com Citation: NSF turns to ancient pottery to improve modern heat resistant ceramics (2012, January 4) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-01-nsf-ancient-pottery-modern-resistant.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Deciphering the elements of iconic pottery In order for space vehicles to work properly, they have to be able to withstand the cold of space, which can be as low as 250 degrees Fahrenheit below zero. Then, some vehicles have to be able to withstand the extreme heat of reentry, which can be as hot as 3000 degrees. Hot enough to melt most any metal. As most know, the Space Shuttle was fitted with ceramic tiles on its underbelly to keep the vehicle from overheating as it came back to Earth, which was made all the more apparent when damage to the tiles resulted in the loss of Columbia in 2003. But ceramics are used in other components as well, and will be needed as more ambitious projects are undertaken in the future. Equally important is the ability of ceramics to remain chemically unchanged when subjected to such temperature variations. Such properties allow for the construction of components that minimize expansion and contraction under such stresses, which can be critical for long term operations in space. This is why the NSF has turned to research scientists to see if the ancient Greeks can provide some insight.Such research will involve using something called x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) – which is a special type of spectroscopy, along with other types of x-ray techniques, to find out what has gone on with iron oxidation in the pottery under study. What’s needed is a better understanding of the molecular structure of iron minerals that were used to make the pottery to help researchers in designing newer and better types of ceramics for future space missions, whether manned or otherwise.What’s interesting is that it is apparently the degree to which the iron in the ancient ceramic pottery oxidized that caused the distinctive red and black colorations that made it so attractive to those that worked with it all those years ago.last_img read more