A 55yearold heritage train once used on regional

first_imgA 55-year-old heritage train once used on regional rail lines in NSW made its longest-ever mainline journey on Tuesday 15 November 2016, when it carried 90 rail and sail passengers on a 800-kilometre trip from the Victorian town of Seymour to Sydney.Cruise travel specialist, Cruise Express, which ran the unique cruise tour, invited rail buffs and locals in towns from Seymour to Sydney to see the two-car, 620-class rail motor, stop or pass by and give the passengers from around Australia a welcoming wave.The record-breaking rail journey was part of a four-night tour that included a three-night cruise from Sydney to Melbourne aboard Golden Princess, a night in Melbourne, dinner on the Colonial Tramcar Restaurant and the return train trip to Sydney, initially aboard the historic Spirit of Progress from Melbourne to Seymour and then aboard the rail motor through to Sydney.Built in 1961 and operated by the Rail Motor Society and based in Paterson in the Hunter Valley, the rail motor set 621/721 has been preserved in its original Indian red colour scheme and is the only 620-class rail motor in active preservation service. The NSW Government built 18 620-class diesel sets from 1961 to 1971, with six sets remaining in active commuter service in the Hunter area until 2007. The sets although were used all over NSW till the early 1990s. Unlike modern trains, the rail motor’s windows can still be opened so passengers could enjoy fresh air, unencumbered views and wave to sightseers.The rail motor’s pairing with the famous Spirit of Progress on the cruise tour was another rail history first. The Seymour Railway Heritage Centre also assisted with the historic rail journey. This was the rail motor’s first-ever visit to Seymour. Aboard the rail motor from Seymour to Sydney, eight rail enthusiast volunteers, including two drivers from Junee, accompanied the 90 passengers, who lunched en route at the 138-year-old Junee Railway Station, with refreshments also brought aboard at Goulburn from local suppliers.Cruise Express Director Meg Hill said the heritage rail and sail tour had proved very popular with travellers, with another planned for April 2017, with the rail motor this time travelling from Sydney to Seymour.last_img read more

Researchers uncover racial differences in debilitating itchy skin condition

first_imgJun 14 2018An international team led by Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers has conducted what is believed to be the largest detailed published study of people with a poorly understood skin condition known as prurigo nodularis (PN). Such studies collect information on a whole subset of people at once and at a particular point in time.Results of their analysis were highlighted in an oral presentation at the International Investigative Dermatology Conference in May 2018 and were published on May 4 by the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology. Their results provide some of the first published reliable information from a racially diverse population about who likely develops this chronic disease, which is characterized by intensely itchy nodules that develop on the arms and legs that can generalize throughout the body.The prevalence of PN remains unknown as the condition has been understudied compared with other inflammatory skin diseases, and its origins, causes and treatment are still largely unexplored. However, says study leader Shawn Kwatra, M.D., assistant professor of dermatology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, PN’s impact is significant.”These are patients whose lives have been devastated by an unbearable, persistent itch that dramatically reduces quality of life on par with the most severe diseases treated by our specialty,” he says.Besides the immense discomfort from itching and scratching, Kwatra explains, PN interferes with sleep and affects social interactions with people who may be (needlessly) afraid of contracting this noninfectious disease. Despite its severe impact, he adds, PN has been largely ignored by scientists.To learn more about it, he and his colleagues conducted a detailed study of data from 909 adults with PN over a five-year period. There were 475 females and 434 males. Of the participants, nearly half were African American, about 42% were white, and about 3% were Asian.In addition to demographic information, the investigators extracted details of the patient group’s comorbidities, or other medical problems these patients had at the same time as PN. The majority of patients, nearly half, were between 51 and 65 years old. The findings also suggest that the condition disproportionately affects African-Americans between ages 50 and 65 as compared with the general population.Related StoriesHair loss could soon be a thing of the past, say researchersLoose double-stranded RNA molecules spur skin rejuvenationScientists develop accurate, wearable voice recognition devicePN was more prevalent in African-Americans, but not whites, with HIV infection. African-Americans with PN in the patient group were 10.5 times more likely to have HIV than race-matched controls with atopic dermatitis and eight times more likely to have HIV than African-American patients with psoriasis who were treated during this time period.PN patients were also 2.8, 4.7 and 9.9 times more likely to have diabetes, chronic kidney disease and hepatitis C than patients with atopic dermatitis, respectively. Further, patients with PN were nearly three times more likely to have clinical depression compared with patients with atopic dermatitis and 2.4 times more likely to have depression than patients with psoriasis.The team suggests their information may be used not only in the clinical care of PN patients, but forms a basis for ongoing translational studies to develop novel treatments for the disorder, which has no FDA-approved therapy or consistently effective treatment.Kwatra cautions that such associations do not demonstrate that PN causes these disorders, or vice versa. More research will be necessary to tease out whether and why these various conditions are linked, he says, which could eventually lead to a better understanding of the mechanism of PN and better targeted treatments.However, he adds, knowing the connections between PN and various health conditions could lead physicians to give patients more thorough evaluations to check for other conditions once they’re diagnosed with PN.Current systemic treatments for PN include phototherapy, neuroactive agents such as gabapentin and pregabalin, and systemic immunosuppressants such as methotrexate and cyclosporine. As PN is associated with dermatologic conditions such as atopic dermatitis in African-Americans, as well as many systemic conditions, further study is needed to determine the exact prevalence.Source: https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/news/media/releases/racial_differences_uncovered_in_debilitating_itchy_skin_conditionlast_img read more