Esquires Granger Magazine Medium So Compelling We All Should Do More with

first_imgSince the report last week about Esquire’s flashy e-paper October anniversary cover—and our follow-up on the technology behind it—I’ve been hearing/reading a lot of negative opinions about it. One Web site called it obnoxious. Rex Hammock said it was “the worst use of technology by a magazine.” Fast Company, in a blog post, estimated that the manufacturing process increases the issue’s carbon footprint by 16 percent over other typical print publications. But, if you ask Esquire editor-in-chief David Granger, the technology could help revolutionize the way we read magazines, beyond the printed page and online.”When I talk to groups I sometimes speak about the days I had when I’d get the new issue of Esquire and go through it and think to myself, ‘Fuck, it’s still a magazine,’” Granger said in a recent interview with FOLIO:. “What I mean is that the medium is so compelling that I and we should all be able to do more with it. The magazine experience is one of the last remaining opportunities to enter a hermetically-sealed world, an edited experience of our culture created by someone else. And, more importantly, it’s an experience that encourages you to stay in it rather than constantly bounce in and out of it. “We have an amazing medium, print, and if we can enhance the experience of it by putting new technology to use, then all the better,” he said.Bob Sacks, an industry consultant and frequent proponent of technology, says that Esquire’s flashy cover may be a small step overall but offers a glimpse of what’s to come in the next few years.”It’s not a representation of what e-paper was designed for, but doing the cover is the right thing to do,” Sacks says. “It will be a demonstration of what it can be used for. In the near future we all will have flexible e-paper readers in our pocket and will be able to access all the magazine and books you want.”Right now, the technology is expensive and, if you believe Fast Company, not very green. Granger says that, with time, he hopes the technology will become cheaper. Maybe, after some refining, the application will become more realistic and environmentally-friendly, too.last_img read more

Amazon leads 700 million investment in electriccar startup Rivian

first_img Electric Cars Car Industry Trucks SUVs Comments 22 Photos More From Roadshow Tags 2 Rivian, the startup manufacturer planning to launch an all-electric pickup truck and an electric SUV, announced Friday it has received a $700 million equity investment that is led by internet giant Amazon. Rivian said it will remain an independent company, but the investment will no doubt help the new automaker push its planned models into production.The investment will help startup Rivian launch this R1T pickup and the related R1S SUV. Rivian Rivian showed off its R1T electric pickup truck and R1S electric SUV at the 2018 Los Angeles Auto Show. The R1T will have a driving range of up to “400+” miles, depending on which battery pack a buyer chooses. It’s scheduled to launch in November 2020 and will be built at a former Mitsubishi plant in Illinois. The R1S, meanwhile, is a seven-seat electric SUV that’ll offer up to 410 miles of range. It’s set to launch in early 2021. The two models share many of their mechanical components.Rivian CEO RJ Scaringe characterized the investment as key for Rivian’s growth. “This investment is an important milestone for Rivian and the shift to sustainable mobility,” he said in a statement. “Delivering on this vision requires the right partners, and we are excited to have Amazon with us on our journey to create products, technology and experiences that reset expectations of what is possible.””We’re inspired by Rivian’s vision for the future of electric transportation,” Jeff Wilke, Amazon CEO Worldwide Consumer, said in a statement. “We’re thrilled to invest in such an innovative company.”Rivian promises its all-electric vehicles will have plenty of off-roading capability.Rivian’s two vehicles will be pricey luxury models, with the R1T tentatively scheduled to start at $69,000. Both vehicles ride on the company’s own “Skateboard” chassis that features a large centrally mounted battery pack and two electric motors. Though the vehicles are impressive, it’s safe to say that it’s still a long journey from showing two vehicles to actually selling them to the general public. Ramping up production will be “the biggest challenge we have,” Rivian executive director of engineering Mark Vinnels told Roadshow in fall 2018.Rivian offered no further details about the investment, saying only that this equity investment round, “includes participation from existing shareholders.” An earlier report had suggested that Amazon was interested in investing into Rivian. That report also claimed that General Motors might also want to invest in the electric-car manufacturer, but as of Friday, there’s no news on that front. 2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything better Amazon 2020 Kia Telluride review: Kia’s new SUV has big style and bigger value 2020 Hyundai Palisade review: Posh enough to make Genesis jealous The Rivian R1T might be the electric pickup truck of tomorrow Share your voicelast_img read more

New Texas Law Allows Merchants To Decline Card Purchases Without ID

first_img Share Austin Price / The Texas TribuneA customer uses a credit card to pay for lunch. A new law in Texas will enable retailers to ask for photo identification with credit or debit card purchases and turn down a transaction if buyers won’t show it.A law that takes effect in January will allow Texas merchants to ask for photo identification for credit and debit card purchases – and turn down transactions if a buyer won’t show it.The aim of the law — which the Legislature passed during the regular session that ended in May — is to reduce debit and credit card fraud. Though merchants will sometimes pick up the tab for money lost to fraud, it often falls to banks to absorb the losses and replace compromised cards. “We end up taking a lot of losses,” said Kevin Monk, executive vice president and chief operations officer at Alliance Bank, based in Sulphur Springs. “One card breach can have a significant impact.”Merchants can ask to see photo ID, but contracts they have with credit card companies often bar them from declining a transaction if a customer refuses to show it. “I think most people, like me, were surprised that merchants cannot already do this,” said state Sen. Bryan Hughes, R-Mineola, who authored the legislation. “The intent of the law is to give Texas businesses the right to take this common sense step of asking for an ID for a credit card transaction,” especially as fraud and identity theft become more common. Payments made using a mobile wallet are exempt from the photo ID measure.Despite the law’s intent, Hughes said that some credit card companies “are taking the position that their agreements (with merchants) will supersede or override” it.Because the new law says merchants may – instead of must – decline a transaction if ID is not provided, “it’s not necessarily requiring them to violate their contract,” said Colin Marks, a professor at St. Mary’s University School of Law and an expert on contracts. Credit card companies could tell merchants that the law “doesn’t require you to turn (customers who don’t show ID) down, and you contractually agreed that you would not,” he said.That’s what Keith Strama, a lobbyist for Visa, suggested to lawmakers during hearings on the bill in April. He said that the law would be confusing to retailers.“The last thing we want to do is get in a legal dispute about how this bill applies to our contracts,” Strama said.Strama told legislators the measure could penalize Texans without photo identification who rely on debit cards issued by the government for certain benefit programs. He added that the law goes against an industry push to get customers’ information out of the hands of store clerks who could be bad actors.Several other groups opposed the legislation, including a state retailers association whose lobbyist suggested that letting employees determine which customers must show an ID could be perceived as discriminatory or biased.Stephen Scurlock, executive vice president of the Independent Bankers Association of Texas, said at the hearings he was “baffled” by the “hostile fire” the bill had drawn. “It is totally permissive. There are no liability shifts. There are are no mandates, and there are no penalties.”Losses from fraud are a major concern for community banks across the state, said Scurlock, whose organization pushed for the measure.Litigation would likely be needed to determine if state law overrules the credit card companies’ contracts, Marks said. A card company, for example, might sue a Texas merchant that declines to process card transactions.Even if the state law takes precedence over current contracts, supporters and opponents of the measure don’t think it alone will stymie many instances of fraud. They say chip-card readers and biometric identification – like the fingerprint used to unlock some phones – could help better protect card holders. And they hope progress will be made on different fraud prevention technologies by 2023, when the law is set to expire.“I don’t think it will stop a significant amount of fraud,” Monk said of the new law. But “I think anything we can do will help.”last_img read more

Dress to impress No we dont

first_imgHow do you define sexiness? What is sexy?, ‘From an infectious smile of  Madhu Bala to the poised grace of Zennat Aman; dancing swirls of Madhuri Dixit and to the zero figure of Kareena Kapoor, everything is sexy! It has nothing really to do with how they dress up,’ said fashion critic and journalist, Reena Dhaka during a discussion in Oxford bookstore.‘Is being sexy anti-sexist?’, ‘Does dressing up in a sexy manner define a woman’s mindset?’ were some of the pertinent questions that were raised during the engaging conversation. An audio-visual presentation seeking responses from various women with different backgrounds attempted  to answer these questions. They all were asked one question and that was, if they dress-up for others? The unanimous answer was an outright ‘No’. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The discussion attracted quite an ethusiastic crowd who were of the opinion that they dressed-up for themselves and no one else.The key speakers of the conversation,  fashion designer, Rina Dhaka and Vinita Dawra Nangia discussed how dressing-up sexily does not really mean that one is easy or available. Nangia further said, ‘To even ask such a question would hint at sexism.’ The rape victims in this fairly sexist society are often slapped with a counter-argument as to how they deserve what hapened to them because they asked for it. When you ask them how? They will promptly reply with, ‘Of course, because of the clothes they wore.’ No one asks for violence, no one wants to get beaten up or raped, no matter what you wear. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixDhaka said being a woman she has to confirm to various roles in a day and is expected to dress aprropriately for all the ocassions. She asked, ‘How can you expect a woman to dress appropriately throughout the day for varied ocassions. Isn’t that hectic? To dress three to four times a day? Just because people think it’s inappropriate to step out in a dress outside in the public?’ She said that dressing-up has nothing to do with sexiness. The definition has changed. It’s all in one’s attitude and the way they feel they are, not the way they dress. However, Dhaka’s ‘When in Rome, do like Romans’ comment did not strike well. She said, ‘In India,  it is very important to select a dress according to the place and environment. There is no harm in carrying a shrug or a scarf, which you can easily take off once surrounded with a like minded people.’ The question this comment raises and remained unaswered was,  why does one need to carry a scarf around? Instead of being preventive, why can’t we strive to change the mindset which compels us to carry a scarf with us?last_img read more

A high sense of purpose in life lowers death risk

first_imgPeople who have a higher sense of purpose in life are at lower risk of death and cardiovascular diseases, says a study.“Possessing a high sense of purpose in life is associated with a reduced risk for mortality and cardiovascular events,” said one of the researchers, Randy Cohen from Mt. Sinai St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital, New York. The findings suggest that approaches to strengthening a sense of purpose might lead to improved health outcomes. The researchers pooled data from previous studies evaluating the relationship between purpose in life and the risk of death or cardiovascular diseases.  The analysis included data on more than 136,000 participants from ten studies—mainly from the US or Japan. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The US studies evaluated a sense of purpose or meaning in life, or “usefulness to others”. The Japanese studies assessed the concept of ikigai, translated as “a life worth living”. The study participants, average age 67 years, were followed up for an average of seven years.  During this time, more than 14,500 participants died from any cause while more than 4,000 suffered cardiovascular events such as heart attack or stroke.The analysis showed a lower risk of death for participants with a high sense of purpose in life. A high sense of purpose in life was also related to a lower risk of cardiovascular events. “Together, these findings indicate a robust relationship between purpose in life and mortality and/or adverse cardiovascular outcomes,” the researchers wrote. The study appeared in Psychosomatic Medicine: Journal of Bio-behavioral Medicine.last_img read more

Aviation industry veteran signs on as Interjets new CEO

first_img Wednesday, January 16, 2019 Posted by Tags: CEO, Interjet, Interjet Airlines, New Hires Aviation industry veteran signs on as Interjet’s new CEO Travelweek Group center_img Share << Previous PostNext Post >> MEXICO CITY — A new year, a new CEO for Interjet Airlines, which just announced that William Shaw will succeed José Luis Garza, effective immediately.Garza, who’s set to join Interjet’s Board of Directors, has over 26 years of experience in the aviation industry, from his early days at a check-in desk in Mexico City Airport, to his most recent venture of a low-cost start-up in the Dominican Republic. Other notable accomplishments including the founding of VivaColombia, launching Viva Air, the first value airline in Peru, and starting the Flycana Project, the first LCC in the Caribbean, in May 2018.Miguel Alemán Magnani, Chairman and President of ABC Aerolíneas, S.A. de C.V., the parent company of Interjet Airlines, said that Shaw’s appointment reflects the carrier’s continued investment in its team members, fleet and product.“Adding someone with William’s experience, entrepreneurship and understanding of the aviation industry to our team will be of great benefit to the continued growth of the airline, particularly our international business, and all of us at Interjet are excited to have him onboard,” he said. “At the same time, I want to personally thank José Luis Garza, who has successfully guided Interjet from our humble beginning flying just three aircraft to four destinations in Mexico to today, where Interjet has become of the world’s fastest growing airlines in North America.”More news:  TRAVELSAVERS welcomes Julie Virgilio to the teamIn October 2017, Interjet successfully launched year-round, nonstop service between Vancouver International Airport and the dual destinations of Mexico City and Cancun. The launch was widely seen as a competitive move against WestJet, which launched weekly flights) from Calgary and Vancouver to Mexico City five months later.On joining the Interjet team, Shaw said: “These are very challenging and competitive times in the airline industry, and I have been very impressed with Interjet’s success to date. Our ‘Value Proposition’ of offering the flying public much more for less, along with the customer experience we provide business and leisure travellers, have been one of the keys to differentiating Interjet from other carriers in our class, and we will continue to do so.”last_img read more

Rice earns three invites to coveted engineering symposium

first_imgShare NAE CONTACT Randy Atkins 202-334-1508atkins@nae.edu RICE CONTACT: Jade Boyd713-348-6778 jadeboyd@rice.edu Rice earns three invites to coveted engineering symposiumNational Academy’s ‘Frontiers’ symposium showcases top young talent Three of Rice University’s brightest young engineering faculty – Michael Deem, Rebekah Drezek and Marcia O’Malley — have been selected to participate in the National Academy of Engineering’s (NAE) 11th annual Frontiers of Engineering symposium. Rice is one of just a handful of institutions to earn three invitations to the prestigious gathering. The three-day event brings together engineers ages 30 to 45 who are performing cutting-edge engineering research and technical work in a variety of disciplines. The invitation-only event is open to fewer than 100 participants from industry, academia, and government. This year’s 88 participants were chosen from a field of 220 applicants nominated by fellow engineers or organizations. ”Significant advances in engineering are occurring where disciplines intersect,” said NAE President William A. Wulf. ”Frontiers of Engineering provides an opportunity for engineers to learn about techniques and challenges in areas other than their own. This new knowledge can spark insights and collaborations that might not have occurred otherwise.” The symposium will be held Sept. 22-24 at GE Global Research Center in Niskayuna, N.Y., and will explore aspects of ID and verification technologies, the engineering of complex systems, engineering for developing communities, and energy. Shirley Ann Jackson, president of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute will be a featured speaker. Jackson has served as chair of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and worked in the field of theoretical physics at both AT&T Bell Laboratories and Rutgers University. Deem, the John W. Cox Professor in Biochemical and Genetic Engineering and professor of physics and astronomy, specializes in statistical mechanics, specifically the computer simulation of complex molecular systems. He is interested in four main areas of research: the adaptive immune system response, cancer vaccines, protein structure and drug discovery, and zeolite structure and nucleation. His group uses both simulation and analytical statistical mechanics to attack these problems. Drezek, the Stanley C. Moore Assistant Professor of Bioengineering and assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering, conducts translational biomedical research at the interface between nanobiotechnology and biophotonics. In particular, her laboratory is developing new molecular imaging technologies for improved detection, diagnosis, and monitoring of breast, ovarian, and endometrial cancer. O’Malley, assistant professor in mechanical engineering and materials science, is director of the Mechatronics and Haptic Interfaces Lab, which studies the use of robotic devices in virtual and remote environments. Her current research interests include the development of new techniques for the display of augmented feedback in virtual environments, the implementation and study of haptic feedback in simulated and remote environments, including associated control issues, and the design and control of wearable robotic devices for rehabilitation and training. To learn more about Frontiers of Engineering, visit http://www.nae.edu/frontiers . The 2005 U.S. Frontiers meeting program is also available at the site. Symposium sponsors this year include General Electric Co., the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, the U.S. Department of Defense, DARPA, Microsoft Corp., and Cummins Inc., and individual donors. The National Academy of Engineering is an independent, non-profit institution that serves as an adviser to government and the public on issues in engineering and technology. Its members consist of the nation’s premier engineers, who are elected by their peers for their distinguished achievements. Established in 1964, NAE operates under the congressional charter granted to the National Academy of Sciences in 1863. ### FacebookTwitterPrintEmailAddThislast_img read more