Communities learn how much money they might receive for hosting LNG line

first_imgMunicipal leaders from across the state came to a preliminary agreement with partners in the Alaska LNG Project on local payouts last week.Download AudioThe proposed pipeline route for the Alaska LNG Project, a consortium of oil companies (Image courtesy of the Alaska LNG Project).The project will make $800 million available to communities facing impacts from the 800-mile long LNG pipeline, with billions more slated for future tax payments. But how much each community will be entitled to is still up in the air.For more than a year, a group called the Municipal Advisory Gas Project Review Board has been working to get to these numbers; $800 million on the front end of the AK LNG Project to pay for things like road expansions and other expensive upgrades, and 16.5 billion dollars for taxes over the life of the project. Kenai Peninsula Borough Mayor Mike Navarre is one of many city and borough mayors on the Review Board.“I think they’re fair numbers,” Navarre said. “A lot of it still depends on how it will be allocated among the different communities and the state.”We could use up this space simply entertaining all the options the legislature has for allocating that money, but that still wouldn’t get us very far. Governor Bill Walker has proposed the state take a 25 percent share of the project, buying out TransCanada. So who pays for what under that scenario?“If the state is a part owner of the project, is that portion of it exempted from taxation and if so, does that reduce those numbers by 25 percent? And if so, does that come out of the state’s share, the municipalities’ share or both?”“And when there’s a lot of money on the table and no one else has much money because of declining oil prices, there will be lively debate over who gets how much of that pot of money,” said Larry Persily, special assistant to the mayor on oil and gas.He used to work for the federal government keeping tabs on big oil and gas projects in the state and now he’s doing the same thing for the Kenai Peninsula Borough. He says all of these discussions, taking place years before a decision will even be made about whether or not to build an in-state gasline, all stem from arguments of the past.“This is intended to avoid the fights that have gone all the way to the state Supreme Court, multiple times, over what is the value of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline and everything attached to it,” Persily said.And that’s why we’ve seen an opening bid, so to speak, of $16.5 billion for property taxes. Actually, that’s a payment in lieu of taxes, or a PILT. If you took all of the pipe and the buildings and the equipment and the land needed to build and maintain an 800 mile natural gas pipeline and taxed it like  regular property, the project would simply be too expensive. So $16.5 billion is what the negotiating parties have agreed to as an alternative.“So there will be a formula, based on production, that will be paid and distributed between the municipalities, such as the Kenai Peninsula Borough where the (LNG) plant is going to be located and the North Slope Borough, Fairbanks, Mat-Su Borough, Denali Borough and the state and that will continue for the life of the project,” Persily said. “What hasn’t been decided is…how it is going to be shared between the state and the boroughs.”There is clearly a lot more negotiation that will take place before we really know how much money communities can expect out of the project, and all of this is before the project sponsors have finished their report on the socio-economic costs. That means schools, hospitals, police and other services that might be needed during construction. That could also mean even more money in local coffers. If the project gets the greenlight. That decision isn’t expected until sometime in 2018.last_img read more

Khulna journo Hedait gets bail until 14 Jan

first_imgHedait Hossain Mollah. File photo UNBA Khunla court on Thursday granted bail until 14 January to Hedait Hossain Mollah, Khulna correspondent of Dhaka Tribune and online portal Bangla Tribune, in a case filed under the Digital Security Act for running a report on the election results of Khunla-1 constituency reportedly with false information, reports UNB.District and session’s judge Mashiur Rahman Chowdhury passed the order after hearing a bail petition filed by Hedait’s lawyer Masum Billah.Police arrested Hedait, also city editor of local newspaper Dainik Probaho, from Gallamari area in the city on Tuesday afternoon.Later on Wednesday, he was placed on a three-day remand in the case.Upazila Nirbahi Officer and Assistant Returning Officer Debashish Chowdhury filed the case with Batiaghata police station on Monday night against Hedait and Rashedul Islam, Khulna Bureau Chief of the Dainik Manabzamin and newly elected vice-president of Khulna Press Club.According to the case statement, Bangla Tribune and Manabzamin published report headlined ‘22,419 more than total votes cast in Khulna-1’ based on false and fabricated information.last_img read more

WBFJA announces nominations for Cinemar Samabartan

first_imgKOLKATA: West Bengal Film Journalists’ Association (WBFJA) announced nominations for the 3rd edition of the West Bengal Film Journalists’ Association Award 2019, titled ‘Cinemar Samabartan’. Veteran actors Prosenjit Chatterjee and Chiranjeet Chakraborty, director Haranath Chakraborty, Gautam Jain of Real Reel and WBFJA secretary Nirmal Dhar were present to announce the nominations and other details of the award ceremony.The award ceremony will be held on January 13, from 9.30 am onwards at Basushree Cinema, Kolkata. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal life”This is the only simple yet authentic award function of Bangla cinema, leaving behind the pomp and grandeur of several other similar ceremonies that will follow during the year. Ours is the only film award of the country that is judged exclusively by film journalists and is also the first B2B/Industry to Industry award ceremony of the year. This year, the theme of the award ceremony is ‘Content is the king vs Audience is the king’. We are trying to explore a new theme that celebrates recent legacies and progressive thinking and vision. Three talented actors will host the show with a roller coaster ride of last year’s releases,” said the WBFJA secretary. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killedThere will be seventeen award categories in the Popular segment, eight award categories in the Technical Award segment and a Lifetime Achievement Award. The nomination categories are Best Film, Best Director (In the memory of late Hiralal Sen), Best Actor in Leading Role, Best Actress in a Leading Role, Best Actor in a Supporting Role, Best Actress in a Supporting Role, Best Actor in a Negative Role, Best Actor in Comic Role, Best Music, Best Playback Singer (Male), Best Playback Singer (Female), Best Background Score, Most Promising Director, Most Promising Actor, Most Promising Actress, Most Popular Film of the Year, Most Popular Actor of the Year and Lifetime Achievement Award (in the name of Satyajit Ray). Award categories for the Technical segment are Best Screenplay, Best Cinematographer, Best Editor, Best Lyricist, Best Art Director, Best Sound Designer, Best Costume Designer and Best Makeup Artist. WBFJA is the first digitally broadcast event of the east. The principle which WBFJA wants to maintain in this award ceremony is ‘Better Judgment, Better Evaluation and Better Recognition’. Senco Gold and Real Reel have come forward to support the initiative.last_img read more

5 Business Lessons I Learned From My Dad the Roofer

first_img Register Now » November 30, 2018 Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goals My childhood summers were like those of most kids whose parents work for themselves: we went to work too.My dad, a roofer and contractor, was constantly working — finishing a job, starting a new one, trying to get more customers. As I was learning the ropes — how to install flashing and a metal drip edge, which underlayment was up to code — I absorbed five big lessons that have helped me build my technology company.This is what’s stuck with me:1. Do something, even if it’s wrong.My dad still loves to say this. He doesn’t, of course, mean you should do something knowing it’s wrong (that’s just dumb). Fear or inertia too often paralyzes us into inaction, yet just as often — and compared to simply getting it wrong — doing nothing is definitely the greater sin. We need to learn by doing and, sometimes, from our mistakes. In software, this happens all the time — you can iterate endlessly but why? Ship a decent version and learn from user feedback to get closer to perfection.At Broadly, we offer small business customers the option to let us put a website up for them. It’s really hard to get the content we need for the “About Us” section from them. Almost 100 percent of the time, we get nothing back. So we started drafting a quick bio for them and now we have an almost 100 percent response rate. Turns out that even when our first draft isn’t perfect, it’s the perfect starting place for the majority of our customers.Related: Amazon Is Huge Because It Started With A Great MVP2. “Stick it and move on.”You can always move forward, in any job. With my dad, speed was always key. You wanted to get it right but not let perfect be the enemy of the good.Good contractors understand error tolerances. When you’re doing internal framing, it doesn’t matter if you’re off an eighth or even a quarter of an inch in certain places. Because it doesn’t affect the integrity of the building, there’s no need to slowly, painstakinglyget that eighth of an inch. Stick it and move on.Here we emphasize quality but speed matters too. There are points in software and in building a house where perfect is essential. But there are times where expending the effort to refine some minor feature won’t achieve anything substantive – but will slow you down. The trick is knowing the difference.Related: 9 Signs Your Perfectionism Is Out Of Control3: When the computer is the “confuser.”My dad is still not comfortable with his computer — he calls it the “confuser” — and he’s not alone. That’s something technologists tend to forget. We assume that everyone finds technology as exciting and world-bending as we do. But in my work, the local businesses we serve aren’t particularly excited to deal with software and don’t care about the complexities. They’re not impressed by some widget they’ll never use that took hours to create.They simply want it to work. If it’s confusing users more than it’s helping them, it’s a crappy tool. It’s not on the user to learn it — it’s on you to fix it. Early adopters might love the challenge and nuances of the newest toy but the average consumer just wants it to get the job done with minimal effort from them. So make that happen.Related: Why Tech Startups Can’t Seem to Stop Flushing Cash Down the Toilet4: Social proof matters.When I was working with my dad, I saw up close and personally that social proof really mattered to people. When my dad started his business, a friend named Roy taught him about sales. Roy was an absolute genius at helping my dad land new customers. They’d put in a bid but, inevitably, some new company we’d never heard of would undercut us. That’s when Roy would start talking.“Are they in the Yellow Pages?” he’d ask. “How big’s their ad? What insurance do they carry? Are they licensed? You know, if they’re not in the Yellow Pages, they haven’t been here in town long. You got their references?” He’d point out all the elements that, taken collectively, were clear signals that the customer couldn’t trust this fly-by-night competitor.That’s what gave us the idea to incorporate online reviews into our product. In the digital age, this feedback on Yelp, Google, Facebook and Next Door is the word-of-mouth, the social proof, that helps consumers determine which businesses are trustworthy.Related: Online Reviews Are the New Social Proof5: Love the smell of tar in the morning.My uncle worked with us and he channeled Apocalypse Now whenever we started a job. “I love the smell of hot tar in the morning,” he’d say with a big grin. This, of course, was an obvious lie. No one loves tar. It’s dangerous, number one. But it’s also hot, sticky and the kind of stink that gets into your nose and stays there.But what I took from this was whatever you do, sometimes the work is hard and annoying. How you approach it really is what makes the difference. Embrace the suck. Because when you get through the hard parts and see what you built, what you made, what you and your team did together, it’s truly an awesome feeling. Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right. 5 min read Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.last_img read more

Rice earns three invites to coveted engineering symposium

first_imgShare NAE CONTACT Randy Atkins 202-334-1508atkins@nae.edu RICE CONTACT: Jade Boyd713-348-6778 jadeboyd@rice.edu Rice earns three invites to coveted engineering symposiumNational Academy’s ‘Frontiers’ symposium showcases top young talent Three of Rice University’s brightest young engineering faculty – Michael Deem, Rebekah Drezek and Marcia O’Malley — have been selected to participate in the National Academy of Engineering’s (NAE) 11th annual Frontiers of Engineering symposium. Rice is one of just a handful of institutions to earn three invitations to the prestigious gathering. The three-day event brings together engineers ages 30 to 45 who are performing cutting-edge engineering research and technical work in a variety of disciplines. The invitation-only event is open to fewer than 100 participants from industry, academia, and government. This year’s 88 participants were chosen from a field of 220 applicants nominated by fellow engineers or organizations. ”Significant advances in engineering are occurring where disciplines intersect,” said NAE President William A. Wulf. ”Frontiers of Engineering provides an opportunity for engineers to learn about techniques and challenges in areas other than their own. This new knowledge can spark insights and collaborations that might not have occurred otherwise.” The symposium will be held Sept. 22-24 at GE Global Research Center in Niskayuna, N.Y., and will explore aspects of ID and verification technologies, the engineering of complex systems, engineering for developing communities, and energy. Shirley Ann Jackson, president of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute will be a featured speaker. Jackson has served as chair of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and worked in the field of theoretical physics at both AT&T Bell Laboratories and Rutgers University. Deem, the John W. Cox Professor in Biochemical and Genetic Engineering and professor of physics and astronomy, specializes in statistical mechanics, specifically the computer simulation of complex molecular systems. He is interested in four main areas of research: the adaptive immune system response, cancer vaccines, protein structure and drug discovery, and zeolite structure and nucleation. His group uses both simulation and analytical statistical mechanics to attack these problems. Drezek, the Stanley C. Moore Assistant Professor of Bioengineering and assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering, conducts translational biomedical research at the interface between nanobiotechnology and biophotonics. In particular, her laboratory is developing new molecular imaging technologies for improved detection, diagnosis, and monitoring of breast, ovarian, and endometrial cancer. O’Malley, assistant professor in mechanical engineering and materials science, is director of the Mechatronics and Haptic Interfaces Lab, which studies the use of robotic devices in virtual and remote environments. Her current research interests include the development of new techniques for the display of augmented feedback in virtual environments, the implementation and study of haptic feedback in simulated and remote environments, including associated control issues, and the design and control of wearable robotic devices for rehabilitation and training. To learn more about Frontiers of Engineering, visit http://www.nae.edu/frontiers . The 2005 U.S. Frontiers meeting program is also available at the site. Symposium sponsors this year include General Electric Co., the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, the U.S. Department of Defense, DARPA, Microsoft Corp., and Cummins Inc., and individual donors. The National Academy of Engineering is an independent, non-profit institution that serves as an adviser to government and the public on issues in engineering and technology. Its members consist of the nation’s premier engineers, who are elected by their peers for their distinguished achievements. Established in 1964, NAE operates under the congressional charter granted to the National Academy of Sciences in 1863. ### FacebookTwitterPrintEmailAddThislast_img read more