Skeeter Beater

first_img In the time-honored tradition of long-haul truckers and cheapskates road tripping across the United States, the backseat of my car has long served as an ad hoc bed for covert slumber away from home and on an adventure. Pull over, crack the windows, grab a fleece jacket for your pillow, and goodnight.Employed carefully — and legally — sleeping in a car makes a lot of sense for a quick night’s rest at a mountain trailhead before a climb or in a campground when you pull in too late to erect a tent. Drive a truck or a van and you can unfurl pads and blankets in back to convert your Ford into a makeshift motorhome.Timco Industries LLC of St. Louis Mo., makes a product to “turn your vehicle into a tent in seconds.” Essentially square sheets of netting with magnets stitched on the edges, the Skeeter Beater window screens attach on a car’s exterior to create instant screened window openings.Made of polyester no see-um mesh, the Skeeter Beaters can keep out mosquitoes, gnats and other bugs.In my test, the magnets snapped tight to the car’s metal and held the screen in place with no gaps. Strong wind might move the Skeeter Beaters, though in a windy setting gnats and mosquitoes — not to mention in-car ventilation — won’t be an issue.In the past, lack of ventilation often hampered my nights sleeping in a car on reclined bucket seats. But with the Skeeter Beaters air flows freely through the mesh-covered open windows, granting easy warm-weather slumber.Since they attach around the windows on the edge of a door, you can go in and out of a vehicle without removing the screens.The company (www.theskeeterbeater.com) sells the Skeeter Beater for about $30 a pair. They come in several colors and eight sizes to fit dozens of vehicles, from a Chevy Suburban to a Ford Focus.(Stephen Regenold writes a daily blog on outdoors gear at www.gearjunkie.com.)last_img read more

Syracuse University statement on NCAA’s denial of Jim Boeheim’s 9-game suspension appeal

first_img Published on December 3, 2015 at 12:26 pm Contact Paul: pmschwed@syr.edu | @pschweds Comments Related Stories NCAA denies Jim Boeheim’s 9-game suspension appeal, will begin Saturday vs. GeorgetownMike Hopkins will coach his 1st game ever on Saturday against Georgetown Facebook Twitter Google+ Syracuse head coach Jim Boeheim’s nine-game suspension will begin on Saturday against Georgetown. Initially, the NCAA ruled in March that Boeheim’s suspension would be for conference games. Following Boeheim’s appeal, the NCAA announced Thursday that while the nine-game suspension would stand, it’ll begin immediately. Boeheim will now miss six nonconference games and three conference games.Here is SU’s full statement from Senior Vice President of Public Affairs Kevin Quinn:“Today, the NCAA Infractions Appeals Committee issued its decision in response to Head Men’s Basketball Coach Jim Boeheim’s appeal of the sanction imposed on him on March 6, 2015. Coach Boeheim submitted his appeal on March 20, 2015.“The Appeals Committee determined that the NCAA Committee on Infractions ‘abused its discretion’ by directing the suspension be served during conference play, because Coach Boeheim was not directly involved in the underlying violations of the case. The Appeals Committee determined the nine-game suspension may apply to non-conference games and be served immediately.“The University is pleased the Appeals Committee recognized that the initial sanction imposed on Coach Boeheim was too harsh. Nevertheless, we supported Coach Boeheim’s argument made during his hearing that any nine game suspension would be too severe based on previous cases, and his lack of involvement in the underlying conduct, which the Appeals Committee recognized.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“As Chancellor Syverud said in March, Coach Boeheim has been a mainstay at Syracuse University for more than one-third of our 144-year history. As we now move forward as a University, we join Coach Boeheim in his continued focus on ensuring our student-athletes receive the best possible education and achieve their highest potential in the classroom and on the court.”Here is the NCAA’s full report on the appeal decision:NCAA Final Report on Boeheim's Appeallast_img read more