Hundreds try to beat November 30 deadline

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 23 Nov 2015 – Over five hundred turned out to a weekend voter registration drive as time winds down for new electors to be added to the national list. Marketplace in Providenciales was on Saturday packed with people trying to get registered to vote ahead of the 2016 General Elections, even though that run off could be as much as one year away. Dudley Lewis, the Elections Supervisor had expressed concern about the young voters. We spoke to a couple of them, who felt excited at the opportunity. Young woman: “It’s to choose who you think is best to represent the country and to do what’s best for us.”Young man: “I think we need more voters voting in our country, especially the young folks. A lot of the young folks fall short on politics and what naught but it is really not about politics it’s about really letting your voice be heard, letting you know that, hey ‘I am a Turks Islander and I can vote’… you understand?”Applications for voter registration are available online, and TCIG has waived all costs to new voters. At the start of the month it was said some 3,000 were eligible to be added to the elector’s list; November 30th is the deadline for the current voter list. TCI Preliminary 2016/17 Electors List to be Publish Friday January 29, 2016 Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Recommended for you Amendments will mean less time at polls, next TCI General Election Related Items:2016 general elections, dudley lewis, voter registration Status cards free first time says Cabinetlast_img read more

VIDEO Watch WCTVs Coverage Of Fun On The Fourth Celebration

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Wilmington Community Television broadcasted live from the Opening Night of last week’s Fun on the Fourth festivities.Anchors Mike Burns and Lisa Kapala, along with WCTV intern Hayden Kane, conducted more than a dozen interviews, including Fourth of July Committee Chair Scott Garrant; Rotary Club President Rob Peterson; School Committee Chair & Vice Chair Jennifer Bryson and Steve Bjork; WCTV Executive Director Shaun Neville; Fourth of July Committee Director Emeritus Tom Pazyra; Forth of July Committee Director and 5K coordinator Patrick Giroux; Jim “Uncle Sam” Buckley; Wilmington Farmers Market’s Amanda Munsie, and more.Cameras also caught the first racers crossing the finish line of the Firecracker 5K. Lisa Kapala interviewed the winners — Dan Vassallo and Dana Calumby.Watch the coverage, courtesy of Wilmington Community Television, below:—Video Playerhttps://s3.us-west-2.amazonaws.com/wilmington.castus-vod/vod/video/9749994f-49a5-417a-acd1-8cae7928378d/video.original.mp400:0000:0051:41Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.—Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com. Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedVIDEO: Watch WCTV’s Coverage Of Thursday Night’s Fun On The Fourth CelebrationIn “Videos”VIDEO: Watch 2019 Wilmington Good Guy Award CeremonyIn “Videos”News & Notes From WCTV: WCTV Executive Director Shaun Neville Answers YOUR QuestionsIn “Community”last_img read more

Cyclone Idai leaves trail of destruction in Mozambique over 1000 feared dead

first_img Residents are seen protecting themselves by the rain in the aftermath of the passage of the cyclone Idai in Beira, Mozambique, on March 17, 2019ADRIEN BARBIER/AFP/Getty Images)Cyclone Idai caused heavy rainfall and strong winds in the region, which in turn brought down buildings, trees and power lines. Roads and other forms of communication have been cut off and businesses too have reportedly been shut. Environment minister Celso Correia said that the nation was now focused on saving and rebuilding lives. “I think this is the biggest natural disaster Mozambique has ever faced. Everything is destroyed,” the Guardian quoted Correia as saying. “Our priority now is to save human lives.” Residents and shopkeeper are seen amid the destruction provoked by the passage of the cyclone Idai in Beira, Mozambique, on March 17, 2019ADRIEN BARBIER/AFP/Getty ImagesThe International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) described the situation as “terrible” and spokesperson Jamie LeSueur said that entire villages have been wiped out. Men carry coffins along a makeshift path on the river in Ngangu township Chimanimani, Manicaland Province, eastern ZimbabweZINYANGE AUNTONY/AFP/Getty Images”Almost everything is destroyed. Communication lines have been completely cut and roads have been destroyed. Some affected communities are not accessible,” LeSueur said in a statement. “Beira has been severely battered. But we are also hearing that the situation outside the city could be even worse. Yesterday, a large dam burst and cut off the last road to the city.”Making things worse, survivors do not have access to medical facilities. “Medical activities in Beira hospital, in local health centers, and throughout the community have ceased completely,” the agency added.Idai affects Zimbabwe and Malawi Timber company workers stand stranded on a damaged road on March 18, 2019, at Charter Estate, Chimanimani, eastern Zimbabwe, after the area was hit by the cyclone Idai.ZINYANGE AUNTONY/AFP/Getty ImagesAfter battering Mozambique, Cyclone Idai moved through Zimbabwe and parts of Malawi as a tropical storm. While 56 have been reported dead in Malawi, Zimbabwe’s Ministry of Information tweeted on Monday, March 18, that 98 people had been confirmed death.Hundreds of residents in Zimbabwe are also said to be missing and President Emmerson Mnangagwa has declared a state of emergency in several regions. “This is a real humanitarian disaster. More than 100,000 people are in danger,” he said. The president also added that bodies could be seen floating at several places and the situation was so bad that survivors had nowhere to go and were taking shelter in trees while they waited for help. Mozambique is witnessing one of the worst natural disasters in its history with cyclone Idai leaving a trail of destruction in the southeast African nation. Over 1,000 people are feared dead after the cyclone slammed into the country last week, with the city of Beira facing Idai’s full wrath. A destroyed car is seen amid the destruction provoked by the passage of the cyclone Idai in Beira, Mozambique, on March 17, 2019ADRIEN BARBIER/AFP/Getty ImagesThe storm made landfall near the port city of Beira on Thursday, March 14, as a high end Category 2 storm with winds of up to 177 kilometre per hour. However, the aid teams are said to have reached the city only on Sunday, March 17, by which time “90 percent of the region” had been washed away. While the recorded death toll currently stands at about 84, Mozambican President Filipe Nyusi said in a nationwide address that the toll could hit 1,000 soon.”For the moment we have registered 84 deaths officially, but when we flew over the area… this morning to understand what’s going on, everything indicates that we could register more than 1,000 deaths,” the Agency France-Presse quoted Nyusi as saying.last_img read more

Trump inauguration prompts celebration in Russia

first_imgThe Kremlin may have spent years reviling America, but Russians hoping Donald Trump will usher in a new era of detente marked his inauguration on Friday with parties and trinkets from commemorative coins to “matryoshka” nesting dolls in his image.Washington was turned into a virtual fortress with an estimated 900,000 people—backers and protesters—descending on the capital. In London, anti-Trump activists draped a banner reading “Build Bridges Not Walls” from Tower Bridge. Protests were planned across western Europe on Friday and Saturday.But according to Gennady Gudkov, a Putin critic and former lawmaker, Russia is in the grip of “Trumpomania”, with state media giving the President-elect blanket air time at the expense of more mundane and sometimes depressing domestic news stories.That, he said, was in part because the U.S. election, unlike elections in Russia, had been unpredictable. The Kremlin is hoping Trump will ease sanctions imposed over the annexation of Crimea, team up with Russia against Islamic State, and cut back NATO military activity near Russian borders.Craftsmen in the city of Zlatoust, east of Moscow, have released a limited series of silver and gold commemorative coins, engraved with “In Trump We Trust” – an allusion to the phrase on U.S. banknotes “In God We Trust”.‘TRUMPOMANIA’Sellers of traditional matryoshka nesting dolls have added Trump dolls to their popular line-up of items carved in the likeness of President Vladimir Putin, Bolshevik revolutionary Vladimir Lenin, ex-President Mikhail Gorbachev and Josef Stalin.And a shop selling Russian military kit located opposite the U.S. embassy in Moscow has unveiled a cheeky promotional campaign offering embassy employees and U.S. citizens a 10 percent discount on its wares to celebrate Trump’s inauguration.Some of Trump’s opponents believe the Kremlin helped him win the White House by staging a hacking campaign to hoover up embarrassing information about Hillary Clinton, his rival. The Kremlin denies that, but few here make any secret of the fact that they are pleased that Trump and not Clinton triumphed.Relations between Putin and Barack Obama had soured badly.“Trump’s election has generated enormous enthusiasm in Russia because his warm words about Russia and Putin have given us hope that the USA and the West will stop their attack on Russia,” Sergei Markov, a former pro-Putin lawmaker, said on social media.“We don’t know for sure if there will be an improvement (in relations) or not. But we Russians are optimists … so we are hoping for the best, while preparing for the worst.”For Russian nationalists, Trump’s inauguration is an excuse to mix fun with self-promotion.They are holding an all-night party at what used to be the main Soviet-era post office in Moscow where they will showcase their favorite prop, a triptych of Putin, Trump and French Front National leader Marine Le Pen.Konstantin Rykov, a former pro-Putin lawmaker and one of the event’s promoters, said on social media it was right to celebrate the first phase of the “New World Order.”“Washington will be ours,” he quipped.last_img read more