Experts discuss arguments for and against assisted dying ahead of election referendum

first_img“Prognosis is an estimate. International literature and our own daily experience shows we’re often wrong about prognosis. Donnelly said she was opposing the act as it was written. TVNZ One News 18 September 2020Family First Comment: One is a ‘researcher’. The other is a real doctor – a palliative care specialist with real world experience and dealing daily with the care of actual people.WATCH as she DESTROYS the argument of the pro-euthanasia academic!“We care for people who are facing their death every day. … We live in the real world. When we read this act as it’s written and apply it to the real world, it leaks. It’s not waterproof or safe in any way. There are multiple reasons and multiple risks we’ve identified.” She said it could be difficult to judge whether a person was being coerced into assisted dying because coercion can be subtle.“We care for people who are facing their death every day. … We live in the real world. When we read this act as it’s written and apply it to the real world, it leaks. It’s not waterproof or safe in any way. There are multiple reasons and multiple risks we’ve identified.” She said it could be difficult to judge whether a person was being coerced into assisted dying because coercion can be subtle.Two euthanasia experts spoke to TVNZ1’s Breakfast about their views on assisted dying ahead of the End of Life Choice Act referendum in this year’s election.Care Alliance’s Dr Sinead Donnelly, a palliative care doctor and senior lecturer at the University of Otago, outlined the arguments against the act. Care Alliance is made up of a range of organisations, including providers of end-of-life palliative care in New Zealand. “We’re concerned about the risk and we don’t believe that it’s safe,” she said. “How can you create a safe law when the consequences are the death of a person with such imprecise so-called safeguards?”Donnelly said, in her experience, it was common for people to feel as if they were a burden. This means people may not have a true choice between palliative care and euthanasia, Donnelly said.READ MORE: https://www.tvnz.co.nz/one-news/new-zealand/experts-discuss-arguments-and-against-assisted-dying-ahead-election-referendumKeep up with family issues in NZ. Receive our weekly emails direct to your Inbox. There are also challenges to making a prognosis that someone only has six months left to live, Donnelly said. “When we read this act as it’s written and apply it to the real world, it leaks. It’s not waterproof or safe in any way. There are multiple reasons and multiple risks we’ve identified.” “I feel they’re actually going to feel a greater burden. They now have to choose, ‘Do I ask for this or not?’”She said it was already legal for people to ask for treatment to be stopped.She said the palliative care system is rapidly developing but it is “chronically underfunded” in New Zealand, and there are inequities to accessing quality care. When asked why she believed the act was unsafe, despite the High Court and lawyers saying there were more than 45 safeguards, Donnelly said the Care Alliance was looking at it from a practical view.“We [at Care Alliance] care for people who are facing their death every day. … We live in the real world. She said it could be difficult to judge whether a person was being coerced into assisted dying because coersion can be subtle.last_img read more

Roundup

first_imgThe following incidents were reported in the USC Department of Public Safety daily incident log between Wednesday, Jan. 18, and Thursday, Jan. 19.Crimes against propertyat 12:34 a.m. on Jan. 19, DPS officers responded to a report of a bike theft in progress at Grace Ford Salvatori Hall of Letters, Arts & Sciences and detained two suspects matching the descriptions given by a witness.  A locked bicycle was recovered nearby and the witness stated that he observed one of the suspects carry it away while the second one acted as a lookout.  The registered owner informed the officers that no one had permission to remove her bike. The suspects were arrested and transported to S/W station for booking.At 4:14 p.m. on Jan. 18, a security guard reported that she observed a suspect remove her property from a plastic bag and a handbag she had placed on the front porch of Alpha Gamma Omega while she was stationed nearby.  The suspect was detained by DPS officers who responded to the scene and he was found in possession of the guard’s property.  The suspect was arrested and transported to 77th station for booking.Miscellaneous incidentsat 4:29 p.m. on Jan. 18, DPS officers stationed at Keck Hospital of USC saw a terminated staff member enter an administrator’s office and demand to speak with him.  The staff member was advised that she needed an appointment to meet with the administrator and the officers escorted her from the premises without further incident.at 9:49 a.m. on Jan. 18, DPS officers responded to a student who was feeling nauseated and weak. An LAFD RA unit was requested and Unit #15 responded. The RA Unit examined the student and transported her to California Hospital for medical treatment.last_img read more