Migrant Families Were Confused When U.S. Expelled Children Into Mexico

first_img– Advertisement – – Advertisement – The transfer was contrary to both U.S. policy and an outstanding diplomatic agreement with Mexico, which do not allow children from other countries who are traveling without adult guardians to be expelled into Mexico. But it is now becoming clear that a number of children have been improperly expelled after the Trump administration shut down the border to most asylum applicants because of the coronavirus pandemic.Since The New York Times reported last week on an internal email that warned border authorities about the improper transfers, Ms. Acuña, who asked that her sister be identified by her first name to avoid immigration repercussions, is one of several Central Americans who have come forward saying they were anxious and confused after their children and young relatives were sent without any adult to accompany them into a country that is not their own. Lawyers from KIND, an immigrant advocacy organization, said that they knew of several Central American children who were expelled into Mexico and that some of them were still in custody there. And the Young Center, another such group, confirmed it had appealed to American authorities in two additional cases — two Salvadoran girls, ages 11 and 15, who were expelled into Mexico and eventually allowed into the United States after legal interventions.“We shouldn’t be encountering these kids at all,” said Jennifer Nagda, policy director for the group. “We have no idea how many cases there are because we’re getting them through word of mouth.”Some parents have had to wait days or weeks to find out that their children had been sent without their knowledge to Mexico.Lenis Manzanarez Suazo, a Honduran who has also been waiting in Matamoros for the American border to reopen, said she watched as American immigration authorities walked her 7-year-old daughter, Samantha Manzanarez, into the United States on Sept. 23. She waited for news, assuming that the girl would be reunited with relatives in Florida. Just weeks after Esther crossed into the United States, a Honduran woman named Paola walked with her 5-year-old son Nahum to the edge of the international bridge that leads into the United States. (She also asked that she and her son be identified by their first names for fear of retaliation from American immigration authorities.)The two had been living for months in a shelter in Matamoros, Mexico, waiting for the border to reopen so they could pursue American asylum petitions. But Paola said she had reached her wit’s end about the conditions they had been living in, and the fact that her son had not been to school in more than a year. She decided to send Nahum to the United States, hoping American authorities would allow him to join his grandfather and uncles in Los Angeles.She said she walked the boy to the bridge on Sept. 5 and watched U.S. immigration officials usher him into the American port of entry. Scared that something might go wrong, she said, she stood on the bridge waiting for news. But after about five hours, she was dismayed to see a Mexican government van drive past her with Nahum inside. Eva Acuña spoke with her teenage sister Esther by phone early on the morning of Aug. 15, about an hour before Esther planned to enter the United States near the Mexican city of Ciudad Juárez and ask for asylum — the end of a long journey from Esther’s home in El Salvador.Ms. Acuña, a legal permanent resident in the United States, expected to hear next from American immigration authorities about her sister’s status. But instead, about eight hours later, she received a call from the authorities in Mexico. Instead of taking her sister into custody, the U.S. Border Patrol had delivered the girl back to Mexico, where she was in a children’s shelter.- Advertisement – A U.S. Border Patrol official raised alarms about the practice in the internal email that came to light last week. Brian Hastings, chief of the Border Patrol’s Rio Grande Valley sector, confirmed the practice had been occurring, and said border agents had been directed to contact the Mexican consular office each time an unaccompanied child who was not Mexican was expelled.Five people have told The Times that their children or young relatives were expelled into Mexico after entering the United States, in violation of the agreement between the two countries.center_img Mexican officials declined to provide her, as well as Paola, with documentation showing that her child had been improperly expelled by the United States into Mexican custody.A.B., a 17-year-old from El Salvador who asked to be identified by his initials because he did not want to face retaliation in his pending asylum case, said he crossed the border near El Paso on July 14 but was expelled back to Mexico and held in a shelter there for two weeks.The American officer who processed his case, he said, told him that if he had tried to cross the border before the pandemic, he would have had more success. “We’re sending you back to Mexico,” he said the official told him. “Maybe next time.”Ms. Acuña’s sister Esther, who is 15, was transferred to a second shelter after being sent back to Mexico, then a third. She was eventually allowed into the United States after American lawyers, working in concert with the Salvadoran consulate, successfully argued that the expulsion had violated both U.S. policy and the diplomatic agreement.She arrived at a U.S.-operated children’s shelter in Arizona on Oct. 23, about two months after she had been sent back to Mexico.Eventually, Ms. Acuña said, the family hopes she can be released to family members in Houston. But when that will be, no one knows. “We waited for a call from a family member or something for three, four days,” Ms. Manzanarez Suazo said. “I was nervous. A week passed and still nothing.”Finally, about eight days later, Ms. Manzanarez Suazo sought help from an immigrant advocacy organization called Every Last One that contacted the Mexican child welfare agency on a hunch that Samantha had been expelled. The hunch was correct. Samantha was in one of the agency’s shelters. Working with American lawyers, Paola contacted Mexico’s child welfare agency and learned that her son had been sent back into its custody. She pleaded to see him, but three days went by before she was allowed to pick him up.Shipping young people back and forth between foreign governments is a sensitive matter, in part because of the bureaucratic red tape that can lead to delays in their release, even in cases like Paola’s, when the child’s parent is waiting in the same country.It is unclear how many non-Mexican children have been expelled into Mexico, because both the American and Mexican governments have declined to provide data on the number of cases. U.S. government officials have cited a legal challenge against some of the expulsions that have occurred under the pandemic to explain why they cannot elaborate further. In a tweet on Friday, a spokesman for the Mexican secretary of foreign affairs said that “at the moment” it had no record of minors entering Mexico without accompanying relatives.“The Mexican government, along with civil society and multilateral organizations, will continue with due investigations,” the statement said. In some cases, including Esther’s, there were no other family members in Mexico to aid the children. – Advertisement –last_img read more

Angels bullpen lets game get away after Shohei Ohtani’s outing shortened by rain

first_imgOhtani said he had never pitched through a rain delay in Japan, where most of the ballparks have domes. He said that was a learning experience, as was warming up on a humid night. Ohtani said he was sweating so much that he figured he was ready.When he came out for the first inning throwing 91 mph, he realized he wasn’t.“I haven’t thrown a 91 mph fastball since high school, so I knew there was something wrong,” he said.Ohtani gave up a run in the first, but he bounced back and his velocity improved. He escaped a jam in the fifth, getting Jeimer Candelario to bounce back to the mound on a 101 mph fastball, the hardest pitch he’d thrown in the majors.Unfortunately for the Angels, it was also his last pitch of the night. Mike Trout, with bat and glove, helps Angels end losing streak Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error PreviousRain clouds darken the Detroit skyline during the fourth inning of a baseball game between the Detroit Tigers and the Los Angeles Angels, Wednesday, May 30, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)DETROIT, MI – MAY 30: Shohei Ohtani #17 of the Los Angeles Angels throws a first inning pitch while playing the Detroit Tigers at Comerica Park on May 30, 2018 in Detroit, Michigan. (Photo by Gregory Shamus/Getty Images)DETROIT, MI – MAY 30: Shohei Ohtani #17 of the Los Angeles Angels throws a second inning pitch while playing the Detroit Tigers at Comerica Park on May 30, 2018 in Detroit, Michigan. (Photo by Gregory Shamus/Getty Images) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsDetroit Tigers third baseman Jeimer Candelario steps over Los Angeles Angels’ Andrelton Simmons as Simmons is out on a fielder’s choice hit into by Martin Maldonado during the second inning of a baseball game, Wednesday, May 30, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Los Angeles Angels center fielder Mike Trout catches a fly ball for the out on Detroit Tigers’ Niko Goodrum during the fourth inning of a baseball game, Wednesday, May 30, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Detroit Tigers starting pitcher Mike Fiers throws during the first inning of a baseball game against the Los Angeles Angels, Wednesday, May 30, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Detroit Tigers shortstop Dixon Machado (49) and center fielder Leonys Martin can’t come up with a fly ball by Los Angeles Angels’ Martin Maldonado during the second inning of a baseball game Wednesday, May 30, 2018, in Detroit. Andrelton Simmons was forced out at third on the play, and Maldonado was safe at first. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)DETROIT, MI – MAY 30: Shohei Ohtani #17 of the Los Angeles Angels waits to throw a first inning pitch while playing the Detroit Tigers at Comerica Park on May 30, 2018 in Detroit, Michigan. (Photo by Gregory Shamus/Getty Images)DETROIT, MI – MAY 30: Shohei Ohtani #17 of the Los Angeles Angels throws a first inning pitch while playing the Detroit Tigers at Comerica Park on May 30, 2018 in Detroit, Michigan. (Photo by Gregory Shamus/Getty Images)DETROIT, MI – MAY 30: Zack Cozart #7 of the Los Angeles Angels smiles at third base while playing the Detroit Tigers at Comerica Park on May 30, 2018 in Detroit, Michigan. (Photo by Gregory Shamus/Getty Images)DETROIT, MI – MAY 30: Shohei Ohtani #17 of the Los Angeles Angels throws a third inning pitch while playing the Detroit Tigers at Comerica Park on May 30, 2018 in Detroit, Michigan. (Photo by Gregory Shamus/Getty Images)DETROIT, MI – MAY 30: Shohei Ohtani #17 of the Los Angeles Angels throws a second inning pitch while playing the Detroit Tigers at Comerica Park on May 30, 2018 in Detroit, Michigan. (Photo by Gregory Shamus/Getty Images)Los Angeles Angels catcher Martin Maldonado looks towards the dugout during the fifth inning of a baseball game against the Detroit Tigers, Wednesday, May 30, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)DETROIT, MI – MAY 30: Mike Trout #27 of the Los Angeles Angels celebrates scoring a third inning run with teammates while playing the Detroit Tigers at Comerica Park on May 30, 2018 in Detroit, Michigan. (Photo by Gregory Shamus/Getty Images)DETROIT, MI – MAY 30: Shohei Ohtani #17 of the Los Angeles Angels throws a third inning pitch while playing the Detroit Tigers at Comerica Park on May 30, 2018 in Detroit, Michigan. (Photo by Gregory Shamus/Getty Images)Los Angeles Angels starting pitcher Shohei Ohtani tags Detroit Tigers’ Jeimer Candelario after Candelario grounded out to the pitcher during the fifth inning of a baseball game Wednesday, May 30, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Los Angeles Angels starting pitcher Shohei Ohtani puts on his jacket during the second inning of a baseball game against the Detroit Tigers, Wednesday, May 30, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)A Canada goose lands near the pitching mound during the sixth inning of a baseball game between the Detroit Tigers and the Los Angeles Angels, Wednesday, May 30, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)DETROIT, MI – MAY 30: JaCoby Jones #21 of the Detroit Tigers slides under the tag of Martin Maldonado #12 of the Los Angeles Angels to score in the fifth inning at Comerica Park on May 30, 2018 in Detroit, Michigan. (Photo by Gregory Shamus/Getty Images)DETROIT, MI – MAY 30: JaCoby Jones #21 of the Detroit Tigers slides past the tag of Martin Maldonado #12 of the Los Angeles Angels to score in the fifth inning at Comerica Park on May 30, 2018 in Detroit, Michigan. (Photo by Gregory Shamus/Getty Images)The Tigers’ JaCoby Jones slides past the tag of Angels catcher Martin Maldonado to score during the fifth inning of Wednesday’s game at Comerica Park in Detroit. (Photo by Gregory Shamus/Getty Images)DETROIT, MI – MAY 30: Dixon Machado #49 of the Detroit Tigers scores a sixth inning run past Martin Maldonado #12 of the Los Angeles Angels at Comerica Park on May 30, 2018 in Detroit, Michigan. (Photo by Gregory Shamus/Getty Images)Rain clouds darken the Detroit skyline during the fourth inning of a baseball game between the Detroit Tigers and the Los Angeles Angels, Wednesday, May 30, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)DETROIT, MI – MAY 30: Shohei Ohtani #17 of the Los Angeles Angels throws a first inning pitch while playing the Detroit Tigers at Comerica Park on May 30, 2018 in Detroit, Michigan. (Photo by Gregory Shamus/Getty Images)NextShow Caption1 of 22DETROIT, MI – MAY 30: Shohei Ohtani #17 of the Los Angeles Angels throws a first inning pitch while playing the Detroit Tigers at Comerica Park on May 30, 2018 in Detroit, Michigan. (Photo by Gregory Shamus/Getty Images)ExpandDETROIT — Shohei Ohtani’s strong start was undone by two rain delays and two rough outings by Angels relievers.After a second rain delay ended Ohtani’s night, Cam Bedrosian and Jim Johnson gave up five runs in the sixth inning of what became a 6-1 loss to the Detroit Tigers – and the Rally Goose – on Wednesday night.Bedrosian gave up a hit to the first batter he faced, followed by a walk and a hit batter to load the bases. After a strikeout, he gave up a two-run single to José Iglesias, ending his night and putting the Angels behind 3-1.“I just had a rough time getting a grip on the ball,” Bedrosian said, citing the humidity. “I couldn’t locate my pitches. No matter what I did, I couldn’t seem to get a grip on the breaking balls.” Angels’ Shohei Ohtani spending downtime working in outfield Clippers, Mavericks brace for the unknown in Game 4 center_img Angels offense breaks out to split doubleheader with Astros Sign up for Home Turf and get 3 exclusive stories every SoCal sports fan must read, sent daily. Subscribe here.“He pitched a great game,” Manager Mike Scioscia said. “It’s a shame we had those rain delays because he would have been able to keep going.”Ohtani had come back after the 23-minute delay, which began immediately after he recorded the final out of the fourth. The Angels were batting in the sixth when the rain returned for another 41-minute delay. It’s standard procedure to pull pitchers once rain delays get to that length, because of the risk of injury from cooling down and heating up again.“I felt like the rain delay gave me a good rest,” Ohtani said through his interpreter. “I felt like I could go back out there. The medical staff said no. I tried to fight my case a little bit but it didn’t work out, so I have to listen to them.”Related Articles Although Bedrosian had allowed only two earned runs in his previous 8-1/3 innings, this game was more in line with his struggles since coming off the disabled list last summer.While his troubles have been all too familiar, this outing was followed by something that was unique.A goose had parked itself in right field during the night’s second rain delay. After the grounds crew came to chase it away, the goose took off and flew directly into a scoreboard on the first-base side, plummeting to the lower deck about 10 rows behind the Angels’ dugout. Some fans and ballpark staff attended to the goose, and the Tigers soon announced that the bird was OK, safely set free outside the ballpark.The Rally Goose – as some Comerica Park fans had dubbed the bird – arrived just when the Tigers were about to get a boost from facing a pitcher other than Ohtani.Pitching his first game since May 20, after the Angels gave him a few extra days for “workload management,” Ohtani gave up one run in five innings, on three hits, with five strikeouts. Jose Suarez’s rocky start sinks Angels in loss to Astros last_img read more

Property a good bet

first_img Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagram The way the economy has developed this year is confusing for people, especially with the property market. When it comes to property, it’s usually the case that either prices are rising so people can’t get into the market; or prices are falling and so home buyers are holding-out, waiting to get in at a low price. But the current market is creating pain for both groups. If you’re in the market, you are in a cycle of rising interest rates and in many cases, an equal cycle of falling property values. However, this comes at a time when there is a tightening of credit policy at all the major lenders. So a home buyer is being scrutinised much more closely for their ability to repay than they were six years ago. At the same time, a flat property market – where capital city house prices have fallen 1.5 per cent in a year – still doesn’t create bargains for buyers. In fact, many analysts estimate our housing market is over valued. The OECD says Australian property values are 34 per cent inflated. My tip is this: this is not a time to be thinking about a buyers market or a sellers market. Currently, we are in a lender’s market. Banks are taking applications for mortgages on a person-by-person basis, they’re looking for good repayment ability, they’re wanting 20 per cent deposit and they are building in a margin for more rate rises. So, the amount the banks will lend is actually the market. In this situation, I suggest you get expert advice from a mortgage broker who can take a look at your situation and plan for the best outcome – and then buy what you can and not wait for interest rates to drop or for property prices to drop further. There’s no point. The tightened lending criteria is here to stay for a while and so the banks are making the market. There’s no more of the old market where you go down the road and get a loan for $50,000 more: they’re all working off the same song sheet. The property market in this country creates steady returns so long as you see it in 10-year terms. If you’re prepared to be in the market, the gains will be there – 7 to 8 per cent per annum, historically – but you must be in the market. Social demographer Bernard Salt says that Generation Y home buyers will rescue this property market because they are not affected by “post-GFC malaise”. They also don’t recall a time when you could get a mortgage with a five per cent deposit. They think 20 per cent is normal, so they are saving. The banks will reward this approach, so best of luck to the Gen Ys.In the meantime, we can learn from this: get advice and then be in the market – time will take care of your investmentlast_img read more