Leadership will impact employee experience now more than ever

first_imgCan managers build connections with employees, manage performance, communicate messages and give recognition remotely?  Are there differences in how teams or departments work that could allow for unique return-to-work plans?  How we return our people to our offices and branches will be one of the most important employee engagement activities this year. Not only will our re-entry impact the bottom line, it will also impact our engagement survey scores, employees’ decisions to stay or look for other opportunities, and how they share their experience with members and prospective hires. So, as leaders, are we ready to challenge our personal working preferences to ensure the best employee experience? Here are a few questions to consider:Have employees been successful at home, and can they continue to work from their home offices?  Have managers set clear expectations and understand how employees are performing both in and out of the office?center_img Can everyone participate in return to in-office decisions? As leaders, we need to assess our current beliefs, understand the true state, and then take action.  Time is passing quickly, so here are a few actions you can take:  Come from a place of empathy: Start by acknowledging that COVID-19 has been and is a shared experience for us all. Acknowledge that each employee is unique and psychological safety comfort levels will vary.Engage employees in the solution: Invite employees into the return-to-work conversation. Create an exercise for departments to revisit team deliverables and goals,  and reprioritize as needed. Then, talk to each of your employees to understand any unique working or scheduling needs. Be clear that this process will involve compromises, and the goal is to find the best solution for the employee and to ensure team deliverables can still be met. Communicate the why: Make sure shared goals and values are not forgotten in this process. Remind employees of why their work matters. If having employees in an office/branch is needed, be clear about why, and make sure they know how you are keeping them safe. Communicate often and make sure there is a ‘source of truth’ where employees can get the information they need.  Create or revisit remote working resources: With a long-term mindset, look at your work from home policies and practices and re-evaluate how managers and employees will connect for 1:1s, dispersed team meetings, etc.  Don’t be afraid to do the right thing: In the absence of a playbook, put humanity first— listen and find solutions in partnership with employees. An A/B schedule can ensure you have a response if someone complains, but being inclusive will drive employee engagement. Don’t let your personal preferences and beliefs interfere with one of the biggest employee-impacting decisions to date. When you engage employees in the process and solution, they’ll feel an increased commitment to the credit union, their team and your members. Now more than ever, we must live out our mission of “people helping people.” ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Chary Krout For over 25 years, Chary has dedicated her career to coming alongside credit union employees and leaders, helping them solve problems, and creating better workplaces for everyone.  Chary believes in … Web: https://www.cultivateresults.com Detailslast_img read more

Migrant Families Were Confused When U.S. Expelled Children Into Mexico

first_img– Advertisement – – Advertisement – The transfer was contrary to both U.S. policy and an outstanding diplomatic agreement with Mexico, which do not allow children from other countries who are traveling without adult guardians to be expelled into Mexico. But it is now becoming clear that a number of children have been improperly expelled after the Trump administration shut down the border to most asylum applicants because of the coronavirus pandemic.Since The New York Times reported last week on an internal email that warned border authorities about the improper transfers, Ms. Acuña, who asked that her sister be identified by her first name to avoid immigration repercussions, is one of several Central Americans who have come forward saying they were anxious and confused after their children and young relatives were sent without any adult to accompany them into a country that is not their own. Lawyers from KIND, an immigrant advocacy organization, said that they knew of several Central American children who were expelled into Mexico and that some of them were still in custody there. And the Young Center, another such group, confirmed it had appealed to American authorities in two additional cases — two Salvadoran girls, ages 11 and 15, who were expelled into Mexico and eventually allowed into the United States after legal interventions.“We shouldn’t be encountering these kids at all,” said Jennifer Nagda, policy director for the group. “We have no idea how many cases there are because we’re getting them through word of mouth.”Some parents have had to wait days or weeks to find out that their children had been sent without their knowledge to Mexico.Lenis Manzanarez Suazo, a Honduran who has also been waiting in Matamoros for the American border to reopen, said she watched as American immigration authorities walked her 7-year-old daughter, Samantha Manzanarez, into the United States on Sept. 23. She waited for news, assuming that the girl would be reunited with relatives in Florida. Just weeks after Esther crossed into the United States, a Honduran woman named Paola walked with her 5-year-old son Nahum to the edge of the international bridge that leads into the United States. (She also asked that she and her son be identified by their first names for fear of retaliation from American immigration authorities.)The two had been living for months in a shelter in Matamoros, Mexico, waiting for the border to reopen so they could pursue American asylum petitions. But Paola said she had reached her wit’s end about the conditions they had been living in, and the fact that her son had not been to school in more than a year. She decided to send Nahum to the United States, hoping American authorities would allow him to join his grandfather and uncles in Los Angeles.She said she walked the boy to the bridge on Sept. 5 and watched U.S. immigration officials usher him into the American port of entry. Scared that something might go wrong, she said, she stood on the bridge waiting for news. But after about five hours, she was dismayed to see a Mexican government van drive past her with Nahum inside. Eva Acuña spoke with her teenage sister Esther by phone early on the morning of Aug. 15, about an hour before Esther planned to enter the United States near the Mexican city of Ciudad Juárez and ask for asylum — the end of a long journey from Esther’s home in El Salvador.Ms. Acuña, a legal permanent resident in the United States, expected to hear next from American immigration authorities about her sister’s status. But instead, about eight hours later, she received a call from the authorities in Mexico. Instead of taking her sister into custody, the U.S. Border Patrol had delivered the girl back to Mexico, where she was in a children’s shelter.- Advertisement – A U.S. Border Patrol official raised alarms about the practice in the internal email that came to light last week. Brian Hastings, chief of the Border Patrol’s Rio Grande Valley sector, confirmed the practice had been occurring, and said border agents had been directed to contact the Mexican consular office each time an unaccompanied child who was not Mexican was expelled.Five people have told The Times that their children or young relatives were expelled into Mexico after entering the United States, in violation of the agreement between the two countries.center_img Mexican officials declined to provide her, as well as Paola, with documentation showing that her child had been improperly expelled by the United States into Mexican custody.A.B., a 17-year-old from El Salvador who asked to be identified by his initials because he did not want to face retaliation in his pending asylum case, said he crossed the border near El Paso on July 14 but was expelled back to Mexico and held in a shelter there for two weeks.The American officer who processed his case, he said, told him that if he had tried to cross the border before the pandemic, he would have had more success. “We’re sending you back to Mexico,” he said the official told him. “Maybe next time.”Ms. Acuña’s sister Esther, who is 15, was transferred to a second shelter after being sent back to Mexico, then a third. She was eventually allowed into the United States after American lawyers, working in concert with the Salvadoran consulate, successfully argued that the expulsion had violated both U.S. policy and the diplomatic agreement.She arrived at a U.S.-operated children’s shelter in Arizona on Oct. 23, about two months after she had been sent back to Mexico.Eventually, Ms. Acuña said, the family hopes she can be released to family members in Houston. But when that will be, no one knows. “We waited for a call from a family member or something for three, four days,” Ms. Manzanarez Suazo said. “I was nervous. A week passed and still nothing.”Finally, about eight days later, Ms. Manzanarez Suazo sought help from an immigrant advocacy organization called Every Last One that contacted the Mexican child welfare agency on a hunch that Samantha had been expelled. The hunch was correct. Samantha was in one of the agency’s shelters. Working with American lawyers, Paola contacted Mexico’s child welfare agency and learned that her son had been sent back into its custody. She pleaded to see him, but three days went by before she was allowed to pick him up.Shipping young people back and forth between foreign governments is a sensitive matter, in part because of the bureaucratic red tape that can lead to delays in their release, even in cases like Paola’s, when the child’s parent is waiting in the same country.It is unclear how many non-Mexican children have been expelled into Mexico, because both the American and Mexican governments have declined to provide data on the number of cases. U.S. government officials have cited a legal challenge against some of the expulsions that have occurred under the pandemic to explain why they cannot elaborate further. In a tweet on Friday, a spokesman for the Mexican secretary of foreign affairs said that “at the moment” it had no record of minors entering Mexico without accompanying relatives.“The Mexican government, along with civil society and multilateral organizations, will continue with due investigations,” the statement said. In some cases, including Esther’s, there were no other family members in Mexico to aid the children. – Advertisement –last_img read more

Golden opportunity to buy Olympian Susie O’Neill’s long-term family home

first_img Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:58Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:58 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD432p432p216p216p180p180pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenHow much do I need to retire?00:58 Olympic swimmer Susie O’Neill with selling agent Christine Rudolph outside 401 Brisbane Corso.Designed by Harry Poulos Architects, the five-bedroom family home on an 875 sqm block has endured the passing of time well. A new-build when Susie bought it for $1.3 million, its modular exterior and open-plan layout were so avant-garde that 20 years on it fails to look dated. While the house has undergone some modifications over the years — a lick of paint, an updated room here and there — Susie said its footprint had remained the same. The house has an amazing view of Brisbane River. Yet coming to own the house in 2001 was somewhat accidental, according to Susie, after the pair stumbled upon it in a renovation write-up in The Courier Mail. “We thought, wow, look at that amazing home, but didn’t think more of it. Then we saw it again, I think it was a few weeks later, in the listings section; it was for sale,” she said. “We were house-hunting at the time but we weren’t really looking in Yeronga, until we saw that house.” This home will have you climbing the wallscenter_img The most viewed homes in Queensland this year “The layout of the house is quite open-plan, which at the time, I guess, was quite modern,” Susie said. “We thought it was space age,” she laughed. One feature of the property that has been a more recent addition is the pool with a Fast lane swim machine. One of only two in the country, you swim against a current to notch up distance while staying on the spot. The house has had minor renovations done to it since it was built in 2001.There is also a wide covered entertaining deck with a built-in barbecue and seating, and mature landscaped gardens that lead to a powered pontoon on the water.Yet, for Susie and the family, the home’s most remarkable feature is the view. The swimming pool has a Fast lane swim machine installed and is only one of two in Australia.“The house has the most amazing view of the river, which you see as soon as you walk through the front door.”More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus8 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market8 hours agoShe fondly recalls times of when her children were young and she would rise early in the mornings, wrap a duvet around herself and, with a cup of coffee in hand, sit and watch the rowers go by. The decor is soothing and minimalist.It’s times such as these that have made walking away from the property so hard — for Susie at least. “I don’t think my husband is too concerned,” she laughed. “I think I get way more emotionally attached to things.“It was the first house we bought together and it is where we raised our two children. One of my favourite memories is of them running around under the sprinklers in the back yard, before we had the pool. So, yeah, it’s hard to let go.” Brisbane Corso is one of Brisbane’s most elite enclaves.The elite road of Brisbane Corso is one of the most coveted in the city for its views and privacy. Buyers of the property will be in good company with several athletes and sporting identities residing in the street, including the owners of champion racehorse Winx and former Olympian Mark Stockwell.While the decision to move has not been an easy one, Susie said the family’s busy schedule meant it made sense for them to be closer to the boys’ school, to cut down on commuting. The house goes under the hammer on September 12, if not sold beforehand. Susie O’Neill’s house is on the market.It’s rare for a house to come on the market in the coveted Brisbane Corso in Yeronga.It’s even more rare that it happens to be owned by a former eight-time Olympic gold medallist and darling of the Australian swimming world. And yet, here it is: 401 Brisbane Corso, home of Australia’s Madame Butterfly, Susie O’Neill. Susie O’Neill’s family home in Yeronga.The swimming champion, her husband, ophthalmologist Cliff Fairley, and their two children, Alix, 16, and William, 14, have lived in the house for almost 20 years and it has been an integral and much cherished part of their lives.More new Anna Spiro’s passion for ‘magical’ and historic Birkdale houselast_img read more