Commission adopts redistricting plan

first_img Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration By Jaine Treadwell Skip The Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies… Email the author Commission adopts redistricting plan “We’re ready to move forward to get it on the ballot in the next permissible election,” he said.The Commission made two appointments to the Pike County E-911 board. Capt. Jimmy Ennis of the Troy Police Department was appointed to the position held by Troy Police Chief Anthony Everage who will retire Oct. 1, 2011. At that time, Ennis will become the city’s chief of police and will assume that position on the board.Ray Armstrong was appointed to fill the position vacated by Carroll Rhodes, as a representative of the Pike County volunteer firefighters. By The Penny Hoarder The Pike County Commission adopted a redistricting map based on the 2010 census at its Monday meeting. The map the Commission adopted is the same as the redistricting map adopted by the Pike County Board of Education last month.Commissioner Jimmy Barron, who made the motion to adopt the map, said the map is actually a joint map that was agreed upon when the commission and the board of education met in an effort to draw district lines several weeks ago.“We were all in agreement on the map with the exception of the District 4 and District 5 lines. There was discussion between the commissioners in those districts,” Barron said. “The map that we adopted tonight is the joint map.”The only opposing vote was by Commission Charlie Harris, District 5. Sponsored Contentcenter_img “I lost 80 or more people in the area from Oak Street to Pike County High School that included Grant Trailer Park,” Harris said. “I only picked up seven people in one small area. The numbers just don’t match up.”Homer Wright, Commission chairman, said the joint map is in the best interest of the people because the district lines are the same for the Pike County Commission and the Pike County Board of Education.“That makes is easier for the people and also for the probate office that is responsible for getting everything in place during elections,” Wright said. “The majority spoke.”Barron also brought before the commission his interest in self-governance. County Attorney Allen Jones said everything is now in place to put self-governance of the ballot to let the people decided. Latest Stories Published 8:00 am Tuesday, September 13, 2011 Book Nook to reopen Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Print Article You Might Like 900th members reunite after 50 years What a difference 50 years make. The men of the 900th Maintenance Company who were activated for duty during the… read more Around the WebDoctor: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Health VideosIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential Health32-second Stretch Ends Back Pain & Sciatica (Watch)Healthier LivingThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

Uruguayan Military Trains Journalists Preparing to Cover Peacekeeping Missions

first_imgBy Dialogo October 28, 2015 Uruguayan Military officials recently taught 30 journalists and social communication students how to prepare for dangerous situations they might encounter while covering overseas peacekeeping missions. “Journalists in Mission Areas,” a program conducted by the National Peace Operations Institute of Uruguay (ENOPU, for its Spanish acronym), included representatives from the Army, Navy, and Air Force, and was held in Montevideo and Lavalleja from September 14-17. The journalists – among them reporters, editors, and news camera operators – also learned what Troops experience while serving in overseas peacekeeping missions. “I consider the inclusion of media professionals in the work of the United Nations of particular importance so that they can see the work that the UN does and can draw their own conclusions from personal experience, which is, without a doubt, a crucial way to mold opinions,” said Colonel Carlos Frachelle, ENOPU’s director. “The main goal around which this course is structured is to make sure that civilians are as prepared as military personnel are when it comes to matters of peacekeeping missions.” The course was last offered in 2011, Col. Frachelle said, adding military officials “decided the time was ripe to offer it again. There is still much left to do when it comes to protecting the security and the lives of professionals who are so valuable to society.” A comprehensive training program The four-day program covered a wide range of topics on what Uruguayan soldiers experience on peacekeeping missions, including the deployment of troops on demining operations; security practices and preventative health measures; and the type of equipment Soldiers use in the field. It culminated with a 36-hour field exercise in Military Camp No. 6, Abra de Castellanos, where journalists, students, and instructors stayed overnight. In compliance with the ENOPU’s requirements, the course included practical training for participants at the camp’s Armory and Mechanical Training Center. Instructors taught journalists and students the best ways to respond to chemical attacks, how to conduct evacuations, and how to use night vision goggles and protective gear. “The permanent use of one’s protective helmet and bulletproof vest also facilitated the immersion of participants into an operation-like environment, since such equipment is required on a daily basis during peacekeeping missions,” Gerardo Carrasco wrote in an article for the newspaper Montevideo Portal . “Those who participate in them must learn to have them on at all times, as if they were a second layer of skin.” The Air Force taught some of the journalists the proper way to board a Military helicopter, before taking them on a ride. “We journalists were afforded the opportunity to face the challenges that those on peacekeeping missions encounter on a small scale,” Carrasco wrote. “We also took note of the numerous details that those on such missions have to make sure they notice since they could make the difference between life and death. An example of this could be knowing how to board a helicopter or armored vehicle in the safest and fastest way possible.” The program is well-known among military officials and journalists throughout Uruguay. Historically, “Uruguayan reporters have been invited to travel alongside the Military and to stay on the mission’s military bases, offering journalists the opportunity to access places and settings which would have otherwise been extremely difficult for them to have visited,” Carrasco wrote. “It gives credibility to the freedom with which we chroniclers work in the field wherever there are Uruguayan Military contingents,” he continued. “It is a testament in support of our work. In fact, the only limits that the Army has put on journalists are those relating to security concerns in conflict zones. They want to avoid having any reporter become a martyr for their profession due to the pure lack of knowledge of the risks that might exist in mission areas.” Uruguay’s history of participating in peacekeeping missions Training troops and journalists for their respective roles in overseas peacekeeping missions is important for a country that is active in such operations, as the country has been sending soldiers to serve as peacekeepers in regional conflicts since the late 1920s – well before the UN was founded in 1945. Uruguay, with a population of about 3.4 million, is considered the world’s leading provider of peace forces per capita, and 90 percent of the service members in the Uruguayan Armed Forces have or will participate in a foreign mission. The country became more active in peacekeeping operations in 1982, when it deployed a contingent of National Army drivers to the Sinai Peninsula as part of the Multinational Force and Observers, which was established as part of the Camp David Accords between Egypt, Israel, and the United States. In 1998, Military authorities created the Army’s National Peace Operations School (EOPE), which eventually became the ENOPU, and includes all three branches of the Armed Forces. As of January 31st, there were 1,459 military and police personnel working in UN peacekeeping missions around the world, including the UN Stabilization Mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH) –even though the Uruguayan contingent was reduced in January 2015–, the UN Stabilization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (MONUSCO), the UN Mission in Liberia (UNMIL), the UN Military Observer Group in India and Pakistan (UNMOGIP), and the UN Operation in the Ivory Coast (UNOCI), according to the UN report “Troop and Police Contributors.”last_img read more

Man spends 43 years in wheelchair on wrong diagnosis

first_img Share 641 Views   no discussions Share Tweet HealthInternationalLifestylePrint Man spends 43 years in wheelchair on wrong diagnosis by: – September 26, 2016center_img Sharing is caring! Share LISBON, Portugal (AFP) — A Portuguese man spent 43 years in a wheelchair because of a mistaken medical diagnosis, finally re-learning to walk only in his fifties, a newspaper reported on Sunday.When Rufino Borrego was 13, he was diagnosed by a Lisbon hospital as having incurable muscular dystrophy, the Jornal de Noticias reported.After that he used a wheelchair to get around for more than four decades — until a neurologist realised in 2010 that he in fact suffered from a different disease that weakens the muscles, myasthenia.The rare disease can be treated simply by taking asthma medication — and just a year after his new diagnosis, Borrego was able to walk for the first time to his usual neighbourhood cafe.“We thought it was a miracle,” Manuel Melao, owner of the cafe in Alandroal, southeast Portugal, told the newspaper.Now aged 61, Borrego is able to live a normal life, requiring only two physiotherapy sessions a year.He insists he harbours no ill-feelings against the hospital that made the original diagnosis, acknowledging that myasthenia was almost unknown in the medical profession in the 1960s.“I just want to make use of my life,” he said.last_img read more

Former Sumner County Treasurer Carolyn Heasty, 71, Wellington: July 20, 1944 – June 14, 2016

first_imgCarolyn HeastyCarolyn L. Heasty, age 71, loving mother, grandma, sister and friend, passed away Tuesday, June 14, 2016, at the Harry Hynes Memorial Hospice in Wichita, KS. She was elected Sumner County Treasurer in 1996 and retired in 2012.Carolyn L. (Barry) Heasty was born on July 20, 1944 in Wichita, KS to Orville Eugene Barry and Beatrice Orlean (Tennant) Barry. She was a graduate of Wellington High School with the Class of 1962 and a graduate of Wichita State University. She lived in the Wellington most of her life.Carolyn enjoyed spending time with her family and friends, watching Wichita State Shockers basketball, gardening, was an active member of Wellington Rotary Club and United Methodist Women.She is preceded in death by her parents.She is survived by her three daughters, Cassy and Danny Smith of Wellington, KS, Mary Mericle and Mike Mills of Moline, KS, and Gem and Steve Watts of Derby, KS; two sisters, Pat and Jimmie Frost and Shirley and Allen Weber all of Wellington, KS; seven granddaughters, Carley Smith and Taylor Smith, Jessi Mericle, Geena Mericle and her fiancé Michael Armstrong, MaKinzie Watts and Maddie Watts, and Tania and Brett Mariman; three great granddaughters, Avery Beatrice Tillapaugh, Evelyn Eugene Hinton and Ella Mariman.Funeral Services will be held on Saturday, June 18, 2016 at 10 a.m. at the First United Methodist Church.  Chaplain Dan Floyd will officiate.  Interment will follow the service at Osborne Cemetery in Mayfield.Visitation will be held at the funeral home on Friday, June 17, 2016 from 1 to 8 p.m. The family will be present to greet friends from 6 to 8 p.m. =A memorial has been established with the Sumner Regional Medical Center Endowment Foundation in lieu of flowers.  Contributions can be left at the funeral home.Frank Funeral Home has been entrusted with the arrangements.To leave condolences or sign our guestbook, please visit our website at www.frankfuneralhome.netlast_img read more