Diversification of business needed in Region 5 – new Chamber of Commerce

first_img…as 5 new faces added to Chamber’s executiveThe Region Five (Mahaica-Berbice) has elected a new executive to serve for the 2019-2020 physical year. Five new faces were placed on the organisation’s executive, with new comer Altabh Khan.The full executive is Khan – President, Niron Singh – Vice President, Tage Singh – Treasurer, and Business Development and LiPresident of the Region Five Chamber of Commerce,Altabh Khanaison Officer – L Luke.Imran Saccoor – Secretary and Krishna Sewlall – Public Relations Officer, previously served on the Board of Directors, wile Leanna Amanda Bachan retains the post as administrator.Khan said that over the next year, the Chamber will continue to embark on its commerce initiatives, including the Region Five Business Fair, Tourism Night amongst others.He said the Chamber will continue to advocate the call for D’Edward/Rosignol to be a township, noting that the community satisfies the requirements for a township.However, the A Partnership for National Unity/Alliance For Change (APNU/AFC) coalition has been pushing to have Fort Wellington become a town in the region.Meanwhile, other activities on the card for the 2019-2020 period by the Chamber include the Region Five Expo, sport and beach tourism activities, and training seminars amongst others.The new Chamber President called on the business community to support his call for a transformation of the region.He said there is the potential to transform the way commerce is conducted and urged all businessmen and women to play their role in the transformation process. Acknowledging that the region is an agricultural driven community, he mentioned that farmers need to adapt to the changing agricultural world and utilise better technology and farming methods, including hydroponics and green house farming, if they are to remain competitive as the cost of inputs continue to rise.Diversification of business was also touted as an initiative to be adopted since some of the traditional industries including rice and sugar continue to be challenged.“Farmers also need access to packaging plants wherein they can have options to market their produce. Cheaper cost of financing is also needed to support the agricultural initiative and farmers need to adopt a cultured approach to seek out foreign markets and export their produce rather than placing reliance on domestic market.”Khan noted that petty crimes continue to be a hindrance to the businesses society and this must be addressed. He added that a safer business environment is needed.Through collaborative efforts, the Chamber hopes to engage and work with regional authorities to implement and develop programmes that can be beneficial to youths for the creation of jobs.Khan added that the Small Business Bureau can give loans and grants in this regard.“However more marketing is required at the regional level as micro and start-up businesses are still not aware of how to access this facility,” the Chamber President pointed out.last_img read more

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first_img RelatedWin a flight to spaceBranson boldly goes… and the pick of the rest of the week’s travel stories.Holiday cats: street cats of the world in picturesCalling all cat lovers! A collection of photos of beautiful ‘street cats’ around the world, from Italy to Japan.5 cool things to experience in JapanBlogger and budget traveller Kash Bhattacharya shares his top things to see and do in Japan. A ‘cat café’ is a cat-themed establishment serving drinks and maybe food, but where the main attraction is definitely cats. We present a purrfect nine of the best cat cafés around the world.Yes, it’s a café populated by cats. How it works is that you pay a fee, usually on an hourly rate, so they can pat and play with the cats in a form of ‘supervised indoor pet rental’. The café staff are usually human.The cat café is a relatively recent phenomenon. The very first opened in Taipei, Taiwan in 1998, drawing not only locals but tourists from Japan, a famously cat-loving country. Japan got its own cat café in 2004 when the first opened in Osaka, Now there at least 39 in Tokyo alone.Cat cafés have strict rules (for their customers) to keep their feline occupants in good health and order. For example, to make sure that the kitties are not disturbed too much, as they don’t like getting their tails pulled by small children and sometimes just want to be left alone for a snooze.1. Cat Café Neko no Niwa, SingaporeAs well as serving coffee, many cat cafés are on a mission to raise awareness of cat welfare issues, such as the plight of stray and abandoned cats. Cat Café Neko no Niwa in Singapore (‘neko’ is Japanese for cat; neko no niwa, cat garden) only adopt stray and rescue cats. Owners Sam and Sue say: “While cat cafes in Japan, Korea and Bangkok usually feature only pedigreed cats… all cats deserved to be loved, [including] the homeless and abandoned ones”. They ‘want to show that non-pedigreed cats can be beautiful and affectionate companions’. Its residents include Emma, ‘a rare find – only 15% of all white cats with blue eyes are not deaf’.https://sp2.img.hsyaolu.com.cn/wp-shlf1314/2032/IMG263.jpg” alt=”last_img” /> read more